Agenda 2030 Working Group

The CAN Post-2015 Group first united around the Rio+20 negotiations in 2012. With the looming UNFCCC 2015 deadline for countries to agree on an international plan to save the climate, and the 2015 expiration of the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), CAN aims to bring the development and environment movements together.. CAN works closely with other NGO campaigns including Beyond 2015 and CIVICUS. CAN has also been active in the Open Working Group Process to define the new set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and targets as well as in the Intergovernmental Negotiation Process (IGN) to agree on the Post-2015 SDG agenda. Currently, CAN has joint positions with Beyond 2015 on the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Agenda on both Environmental Sustainability and Energy.

For more information please contact:
Diego Martinez, CAFOD, dmartinez@cafod.org.uk

CAN Intervention: High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF), July 2017

Climate change is front and centre in Agenda 2030, with a specific goal, SDG13, and many targets linked to climate change under all 17 goals. Implementing the SDGs needs an integrated approach with the Paris Climate Agreement, and such an approach must prioritise actions that deliver equally on both agreements.

One of the tools to promote an integrated implementation approach is precisely national reporting. We urge member states to do their best to include climate change in their Voluntary National Reviews.

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Joint G20 Engagement Groups Statement on the Withdrawal of the United States from the Paris Climate Agreement

We call for responsible leadership and long-term frameworks 

Climate change represents one of the largest risks to sustainable development, gender equality, inclusiveness, equitable economic growth, and financial stability. To curtail climate change, we need fast and ambitious global action. Therefore, we, the Chairs of the Climate and Energy Taskforces of the G20 Engagement Groups Business 20, Civil 20, and Think 20 as well as the Engagement Groups Labor 20, Women 20 and Youth 20 – together with the Foundations 20 –, consider the decision of the U.S. Government to pull out of the Paris Climate Agreement as very short-sighted and irresponsible. This decision not only ignores the reality of climate change and the opportunities of an international framework for the necessary transformation but also undermines the standing of the United States as a reliable partner in solving global problems. Ignoring the threat posed by climate change endangers a sustainable future for today’s youth and coming generations. Today’s challenges are global in nature and require coordinated solutions and international cooperation. We need globally agreed upon targets and frameworks – like the Paris Agreement and the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – to transform huge challenges into opportunities and to create a perspective for innovation, decent jobs, and a vivid civil society. 

While we welcome constructive suggestions on how to implement the Paris Agreement, the UNFCCC and many countries have made clear that the agreement cannot be renegotiated. We agree with this and strongly encourage the United States to stay in. 

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Forget Forecasting and Back Backcasting

We’re all familiar with forecasts. There’s not much to be done if you’ve planned your Sunday picnic when it’s set to rain. All that’s left is hoping, often in vain, that rain will turn into shine. Let’s flip this idea of looking into the future on its head. Instead of forecasting what is likely to happen, how about backcasting? If we know where we want to be, we can work backwards and plan how to get there!

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CAN Briefing: G20 Key Demands, July 2016

In December 2015, the G20, as part of the 196 Parties to the UNFCCC, committed to a historic global agreement to address climate change and pursue efforts to limit the global temperature increase to 1.5°C above preindustrial levels, so as to mitigate the harmful effects on the world’s people, biodiversity and the global environment.

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The Right Agriculture (Workshop) Inputs

Before the SBSTA agriculture workshops, ECO wants to remind Parties that nearly 800 million people are chronically hungry. With over 75% of the world’s poor people living in rural areas and primarily reliant on agriculture, this issue needs to be higher up in the food chain of importance.

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WS2 and Adaptation: The Talk of the Talks

ECO hears rumours that Parties have discussed the possibility of having a Technical Examination Process (TEP) on adaptation, and we’d be delighted if this was true. After all, there are more gaps in these negotiations than even ECO can keep track of, from gigatonnes to dollars. Adaptation appears to be one of the victims of process, and seemingly never has its time to shine. Finance for adaptation remains grossly insufficient, and more action is needed to increase the resilience of vulnerable communities and ecosystems.

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CAN letter to UN Missions prior to UN Post-2015 Summit, September 2015

Climate Action Network, would like to offer its sincere congratulations to all UN member states on the near-finalization of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development following many months of intense negotiations.  
As a worldwide network of over 950 Non-Governmental Organizations in nearly 100 countries working to promote action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels, we would like to highlight the importance of shifting to implementation of the SDGs, in order to achieve climate-resilient sustainable development, and to provide a strong political signal for a successful outcome at UNFCCC COP 21 in Paris this December.

CAN would also like to ask all Governments to give prominence in their Head of State speech at UNGA in September 2015 to the need for integrating climate action into national policy frameworks, including through the development and adoption of national plans towards phasing out fossil fuel emissions and adopting a pathway towards 100 % renewable energy and energy efficiency.

In order to ensure that COP 21 in Paris provides the political and economic signal for countries to be able to achieve the SDGs, Governments should take the opportunity to highlight the imperative of adopting a coherent long-term vision for climate mitigation, adaptation, and means of implementation in the 2015 Paris Agreement. Key elements we encourage you to highlight include:

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Agenda 2030 — Share the Love in Paris

ECO is truly enthusiastic about the global sustainable development agenda: “Transforming our World: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” which received a standing ovation when adopted last month in New York.

ECO strongly urges negotiators to support the proposal currently captured in preambular paragraph 33 of section III, which references the post-2015 agenda, to ensure alignment of the climate and development processes.

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Let’s leave no one behind

ECO congratulates governments on the adoption of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. This not only provides positive momentum towards Paris but, also sends a strong message about the necessity of adopting an integrated approach to sustainable development.

The Paris outcomes should build on this momentum and promote the effective integration of human rights and gender equality into climate action. Such integration would provide three crucial benefits.

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