Flex Mechs Working Group

The CAN Flexible Mechanisms Group coordinates advocacy and policy work around carbon markets. The group’s main focus is to strengthen the environmental and social integrity of both offsetting and cap-and-trade schemes. In the international climate policy process the group has made submissions to the UNFCCC on all three Kyoto trading mechanisms as well as the two trading mechanisms currently discussed under the Convention (Framework for Various Approaches and New Market Mechanism). The group also exchanges information on regional and national carbon markets and helps national NGOs in developing their policy positions.

For more information please contact:
Andy Katz, Sierra Club, andykatz@sonic.net
Gilles Dufrasne, Carbon Market Wacht: gilles.dufrasne@carbonmarketwatch.org

Another Look at Closing the Gigatonne Gap

 

In narrowing the negotiating text here in Tianjin, delegates should focus on a shared vision of limiting global temperature rise to 1.5° C and atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide of no more than 350 ppm. 

Anything above these levels would result in a host of severe impacts, including the inundation of low-lying island nations, the complete loss of coral reefs and summer Arctic sea ice, as well as the potential triggering of irreversible feedbacks adding massively to climate disruption. 

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Mexico Workshop Day 1 - Gerardo Honty

Gerardo Honty, from Uruguay, discusses challenges faced in Latin America, and the re-emergence and development of CAN Latin America at the CAN Southern Civil Society Pre COP 16 Preparatory Meeting.

7 September, Mexico City

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CAN Intervention - KP Opening Intervention - 1 Jun 2010

Thank you Mr Chair, Distinguished delegates, Clearly, progress is needed on the KP track here in Bonn.

CAN would like to remind delegates that when the KP was first negotiated, Parties agreed targets first, and the following years were spent agreeing the loopholes to accommodate them - loopholes that have contributed to the gigatonnes gap between accounting for emissions and what the atmosphere actually sees.

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