Press Releases

CAN is an important, critical voice in the international climate policy process. The network’s regular press briefings and commentary help journalists and their audience make sense of what can be a baffling process, even to those who have been covering it for years.

CAN helps coordinate and amplify the communications work of its 850 members around major international climate processes. CAN also provides an important capacity building role for some members interested in boosting their communications efforts.

You can find a range of our latest resources and releases below:

Previewing the August 2010 Bonn Climate Talks

[Bonn, Germany]  An on-demand webcast is available featuring a briefing in Bonn hosted by Climate Action Network. Speakers preview the coming week of talks and summarise recent developments in the climate world.

The webcast is available for viewing on the UNFCCC website at:
 
 
Nina Jamal, IndyACT:
"If we are to achieve progress by Cancun then Parties should adopt the current legal text and start line by line negotiations this week."
Manuel Oliva, Conservation International
"Parties should not allow U.S. domestic politics to lower the overall level of ambition of an international agreement, which is guided by what the science requires."
Lutz Morgenstern, Germanwatch
“It illustrates the urgency and dimension of the problems that would occur if there is a gap between the first and second Kyoto Protocol commitment periods.”
What: On-demand webcast previewing the August Bonn climate talks.
Where: UNFCCC On-line Newsroom, see link above
When: On demand, originally webcast Monday, 14:30 CET, August 2, 2010
 
Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 500 non-governmental organizations working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels.  For more information: www.climatenetwork.org
 
Media contacts:
Vanessa Bulkacz, CAN Europe Communications Manager:
+32 494 525 738, Vanessa@climnet.org 
 
Larissa Neubauer, Germanwatch Press and PR Officer
+49 151 252 110 72, neubauer@germanwatch.org

Fossil of the Day Awards

The Climate Action Network (CAN), a coalition of over 500 NGOs worldwide, gives out 'Fossil of The Day' awards to the countries who perform the worst during the past day's negotiations at the UN climate change conference.

The awards given out on June 8, 2010 in Bonn, Germany were as follows: Saudia Arabia was awarded First Place.

Saudia Arabia received the 1st Place Fossil for ingeniously linking carbon capture and storage (CCS) to reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation in developing countries (REDD). In today’s debate on REDD, there was general agreement on having additional public funding for REDD; the Saudis said they would only consent if there were funding windows for all other mitigation activities, including CCS. That would not only mean that they can “Compensate” for emissions from the oil they produce, but also get money for it, holding REDD hostage in the process.

Russia was awarded Second Place. Russia received the 2nd Place Fossil for very significant weakening of its emissions reduction commitment from 25% to 15% of 1990 levels if Land Use, Land Use Change, and Forestry (LULUCF) is not counted. The Russian president announced the 25% target as unconditional, but the Russian delegation converted this to being conditional in yesterday’s Numbers+LULUCF contact group. In addition, Russia’s proposal to account for LULUCF would hide huge quantities of emissions.

About the fossils:

The Fossil-of-the-day awards were first presented at the climate talks in 1999, also in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action Network (CAN), a worldwide network of over 500 non-governmental organisations, vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress in the negotiations in the last days of talks. www.climatenetwork.org

BONN, GERMANY 2010-06-08

Fossil of the Day Awards

BONN, GERMANY 2010-06-07

The Climate Action Network (CAN), a coalition of over 500 NGOs worldwide, gives out 'Fossil of The Day' awards to the countries who perform the worst during the past day's negotiations at the UN climate change conference.

The awards given out on June 7, 2010 in Bonn, Germany were as follows:

Canada was awarded First Place. Canada earns a Fossil of the Day for reducing its mitigation commitment after Copenhagen to the same level pledged by the United States of America. This January, Canada scrapped a 2020 target equivalent to 3% below 1990 in favour of one equivalent to 3% above 1990, using the rationale of following the U.S. Canada is endangering progress on post-Copenhagen targets by acting like the 51st U.S. state.

Saudi Arabia was awarded Second Place. Saudi Arabia earns 2nd Place for being the only country trying to block discussion of bunker fuels. Speaking in this morning's LCA contactgroup on sectoral approaches, Saudi asked the chair not to bring forward any text on reducing emissions from international aviation and shipping fuels and warned her that discussions on this issue 'would be futile'. No prizes for guessing who will try to wreck that debate.

About the fossils:

The Fossil-of-the-day awards were first presented at the climate talks in 1999, also in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action Network (CAN), a worldwide network of over 500 non-governmental organisations, vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress in the negotiations in the last days of talks.

www.climatenetwork.org

Fossil of the Day Awards

BONN, GERMANY 2010-04-11

The Climate Action Network (CAN), a coalition of over 500 NGOs worldwide, gives out two 'Fossil of The Day' awards to the countries who perform the worst during the past days negotiations at the UN climate change conference.

The awards given out on April 11, 2010 in Bonn, Germany were as follows:

Russia and Japan awarded First Place. What is it about the environmental impact of current Kyoto Protocol emissions reduction pledges that Japan and Russia don’t want to know – or don’t want the rest of us to know? These two parties have reportedly been blocking moves in the Kyoto discussions to request that the UNFCCC prepare a technical paper analyzing the environmental impact of the pledges being put forward by Annex B parties under the Kyoto Protocol. Could it be that they don’t want to face the truth? That most of the Kyoto parties' pledges are not consistent with the two-degree goal that so many of them say they desire to meet? That there is a multi-gigatonne gap between the promised cuts by Annex B and the cuts the science demands? To Japan and Russia we say: step out of the way and let this important work be done.

The Second Prize Fossil to Saudi Arabia. Starting from the first day of the UN climate session, the Saudis blocked rules of procedure, causing the exhausting and frustrating need for consensus. Can you imagine the progress that could be made if the Saudis' mission was not global destruction through blocking effective climate action and adaptation? So, as expected, the Saudis shone the past three days, first by undermining the chair by giving her a lesson on how to do her job; second, by saying that observers should respect their roles and simply observe, rather than engage; finally, by working hard to not giving the chair flexibility to push the process forward by opposing everything from producing new text to horizontal contact groups.

Third Place Fossil to Canada. Canada was awarded third place for failing to understand that emissions and not targets are supposed to be reduced. Canada's target under the Kyoto Protocol was 6% below 1990 levels by 2012. The Canadian Government walked away from this target long ago and replaced it with a unilateral target of 20% below 2006 levels by 2020 (which equates to a 3% reduction based on 1990 levels). As part of its association with the Accord, Canada changed its target and base year to a 17% reduction below 2005 levels. Which, by the way, is the same number as the USA - now who says Canada is not the 51st state? On a 1990 base year this translates to a 3% increase on 1990 levels! If Canada feels the need to harmonize its target with another country - may we suggest Norway, instead of the USA, who has a 40% below 1990 levels by 2020 science-based target?

About the fossils:

The Fossil-of-the-day awards were first presented at the climate talks in 1999, also in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action Network (CAN), a worldwide network of over 500 non-governmental organisations, vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress in the negotiations in the last days of talks. www.climatenetwork.org

Fossil of the Day Awards

BONN, GERMANY 2010-06-05

The Climate Action Network (CAN), a coalition of over 500 NGOs worldwide, gives out 'Fossil of The Day' awards to the countries who perform the worst during the past day's negotiations at the UN climate change conference.

The awards given out on June 5, 2010 in Bonn, Germany were as follows:

The United States of America was awarded First Place. The U.S. earns the Fossil of the Day for blocking the common space discussion on mitigation in the Ad Hoc Working Group for Long-term Cooperative Action yesterday. Failing to pass a strong climate and energy bill is keeping them from participating in cross-cutting discussions, like the one AOSIS proposed, to build a post-2012 agreement to reduce global warming emissions.

About the fossils:

The Fossil-of-the-day awards were first presented at the climate talks in 1999, also in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action Network (CAN), a worldwide network of over 500 non-governmental organisations, vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress in the negotiations in the last days of talks.

www.climatenetwork.org

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