Eco Digital Blog

Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, November 11, 2016 - 19:18

Maybe being awarded the Fossil last Wednesday helped because Germany has pulled itself together and ended the fight between the ministries of environment, economy, agriculture and transport. It also finally published its 2050 climate action plan yesterday.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, November 11, 2016 - 19:16

ECO was thrilled to be able to participate in the informal session of the loss and damage discussion beyond the first contact group. But this excitement was watered down when a Party proposed to delete the paragraph that allowed relevant organisations to express their views and provide input on the possible activities in the work stream of the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage (WIM), before the first meeting of the Executive Committee in 2017.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, November 11, 2016 - 19:14

Finally, the juicy discussion on long-term finance under COP agenda item 10a is getting off the ground. It’s not surprising that virtually every developed country that spoke yesterday celebrated their roadmap towards the $100-billion-a-year promise. And of course they highlighted their projection that public adaptation finance may double by 2020. Maybe developed countries even think they are off the hook when looking at those projections. Yet, with a closer look, a few additional things come to mind that may require COP action.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, November 11, 2016 - 19:12

The question on everyone’s lips has been: where will the next COP be? Ladies and gentlemen, ECO is glad to inform you that Fiji will have the Presidency of COP23 in 2017. Before you get too excited and start packing your scuba gear though, you should read the fine print: the official bidding proposal requested that COP23 be hosted in Bonn, Germany. All that remains are procedural matters to officially adopt Fiji’s nomination at the COP plenary session. Worry not delegates, even though the COP itself will be in Bonn (think about German night markets!), the pre-COP may be in Fiji.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, November 11, 2016 - 19:10

The period through 2020 is critical to increase ambition. The 2018 Facilitative Dialogue will play a key role. The IPCC Special Report on 1.5°C (expected September 2018) will provide important input. Before Paris, the scientific input of the First Periodical Review (FPR) and its Structured Expert Dialogue (SED) was critical.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, November 11, 2016 - 19:08

Yesterday was a good day in that there was no official Fossil of the Day winner; though some would say Venezuela deserves at least an honourable mention for attempting to throw the baby out with the bathwater.

ECO completely gets that fossil fuel companies shouldn’t be influencing negotiations. Organisations making a business out of polling have no place here. That doesn’t mean that they should be lumped and grouped in with everyone else in civil society though!

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 19:18

ECO readers know that to keep warming to well below 1.5°C, we need to increase ambition before 2020. The good news is that there are countless opportunities for reducing emissions more quickly. Developed countries in particular have responsibility for increasing their ambition and providing the necessary support so these opportunities can be realised.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 19:16

In preparation for the high-level part of the Facilitative Dialogue on enhancing ambition and support taking place next Wednesday, ECO would like to raise the profile of the helpful guiding questions proposed by the Presidency. In particular, we would like to ask, what immediate domestic steps should countries take to raise overall ambition?

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 19:14

Given the current lack of collective ambition, the Global Stocktake is a crucial tool to make a serious assessment of the Parties’ progress on meeting the objectives they all signed up to in Paris, and identify what still needs to be done. The Global Stocktake must gather momentum by ensuring broad ownership over its process and its conclusion.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 19:12

While Parties negotiate key aspects of the Paris Agreement in the APA informals, only 2 representatives per constituency are allowed to enter each of these sessions. ECO reminds Parties that just 6 months ago, all Parties “reaffirmed the fundamental value of effective participation by observers in the intergovernmental process […] and acknowledged the need to further enhance effective engagement of observer organisations as the UNFCCC process moves forward into implementation and operationalisation of the Paris Agreement” (SBI conclusions on AIM).

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