Eco Digital Blog

Submitted by ECO Editor on Thursday, May 3, 2018 - 20:14

Parties have started to develop roadmap and timeframe to take forward Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture (KJWA). Parties surely need no reminder that climate action under the Paris Agreement will kick off in 2020, and that agriculture will be one of the key components for many countries’ NDCs in adaptation and mitigation.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Thursday, May 3, 2018 - 20:12

ECO was pleasantly surprised with yesterday’s country announcements on long-term strategies (LTS) during the opening plenary session of the Talanoa Dialogue. AILAC and the EU both clearly marked LTS as solutions for tackling climate change. ECO believes such strategies allow countries to structure what they’re going to do to tackle climate and outline how they’re going to do it, and so are key tools in helping countries to break the “ambition ceiling”.

 

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Thursday, May 3, 2018 - 20:10

Ludwig is well known to be a lover of modern art, especially of Andy Warhol, who famously said that “art is what you can get away with.” Consequently, he was delighted to see that Australia obviously sha

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Thursday, May 3, 2018 - 20:08

The writing is on the wall – we need finance and (non-insurance) financial instruments to address loss and damage!

 

The COP has given the ExCom a clear mandate to use the Suva Expert Dialogue (SED) to work on enhancing finance (and other means of support) for vulnerable countries and communities.

 

Developing countries and experts were unanimous that we must find more money. Vulnerable people are currently facing “exploding risks” they didn’t create and are being left to pay for them. This must be reversed.

 

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Thursday, May 3, 2018 - 20:06

While raising ambition has become the buzzword at the UNFCCC talks, ECO would like to encourage Parties to consider a more comprehensive definition of ambition. What if we measured successful climate action not only from a quantitative perspective (e.g.  measured in tons of greenhouse gases and Dollars for climate finance?), but also from a qualitative perspective (e.g. how has climate action contributed to respecting, promoting and considering human rights and related principles and obligations)?

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Tuesday, May 1, 2018 - 20:38

ECO eagerly awaited the opening plenary of the Talanoa Dialogue yesterday, excited to see which climate champions would emerge. First off the blocks were the LDCs and AOSIS, both groups calling for the Talanoa Dialogue to result in enhanced ambition in the form of updated NDCs. AILAC likewise called for having updated NDCs by 2020, adding the importance of developing long-term strategies by 2020, as well that provide domestic roadmaps for the transformation that is required to fulfill the goals of the Paris Agreement.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Tuesday, May 1, 2018 - 20:36

This year will be the third time the COP takes place in Poland — Dziękuję Ci [thank you]. ECO looks forward to more pierogi and sausages!

 

Sadly, food doesn’t make a good COP. COP24 is a chance for the Polish government to step up, help lead the transition, and strengthen global climate action. Poland can use this moment to revamp the country’s international reputation, rather than strengthening its shameful position as Europe’s number one climate laggard.

 

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Tuesday, May 1, 2018 - 20:34

Have you participated in the negotiations on the Modalities for the accounting of financial resources in SBSTA lately? When first hearing some countries and the co-chairs claiming they already had a very solid base to start drafting a final text soon, ECO felt like singing Waka Waka. As Sharkira said: “You know it’s serious we’re getting closer, this isn’t over”.

 

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Tuesday, May 1, 2018 - 20:32
  1. The gap is clear, and it is finance!  

    There was much stating of the obvious – vulnerable people on the front line of climate impacts don’t have the luxury of assessing their risks neither considering to transfer or retain them. As the representative of Suriname brilliantly reminded participants: if a whole city like Paramaribo is at risk, what can we do?
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Submitted by ECO Editor on Tuesday, May 1, 2018 - 20:18

At “only” 1⁰C of global warming, extreme climate impacts — exceeding the adaptive capacity of countries, communities, and ecosystems — are already mounting. Loss and damage caused by climate change extends from slow onset processes like sea level rise, glacial retreat to extreme events such as floods, hurricanes, and tropical cyclones. Severe climate change consequences which the poor and vulnerable regions around the world already face.

 

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