Eco Digital Blog

Submitted by ECO Editor on Tuesday, June 18, 2019 - 20:18

ECO is excited to see nine non-Annex I Parties participating in the facilitative sharing of views (FSV) for their biennial update reports (BURs) and offers our congratulations to Parties for the work in developing their BURs. ECO thinks the FSV can be a great place to share lessons learned and experiences with other Parties in a constructive and welcoming environment. We look forward to hearing your presentations and Q&A sessions throughout the day.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Tuesday, June 18, 2019 - 20:16

True to the motto “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” ECO calls on negotiators to prevent any disruption or interference with the Adaptation Fund‘s (AF) ability to effectively fulfil its mandate. Negotiators just need to play an enabling role to ensure that the AF can continue to effectively serve the Paris Agreement, as it has since January 2019.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Tuesday, June 18, 2019 - 20:14

“Lights… Camera… Action!”–the second shoot of the agriculture discussions at the UNFCCC! Since 2009, Parties have struggled with what to do with agriculture. We are now in the midst of several workshops discussing adaptation, soils, nutrient use, manure management, and the critical issue of socio-economic and food security aspects of climate action in agriculture with a decision due in one and a half years, at COP26.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Tuesday, June 18, 2019 - 20:12

This morning’s ECO brings exciting news for you!

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Tuesday, June 18, 2019 - 20:10

How much warming (and resulting climatic disruption) is too much? The 2013-2015 review of 1.5°C of warming concluded there would be serious and perhaps irreversible impacts from exceeding this threshold.

Since the Paris Agreement was adopted, we have had the IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C (SR1.5) and more science is coming every day with increasingly alarming news of the consequences of exceeding 1.5°C.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Tuesday, June 18, 2019 - 20:08

COP24 requested the SBSTA to consider the IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C (SR1.5°C) in order to strengthen scientific knowledge on the 1.5°C goal.

With apologies to Shakespeare (and the planet), it appears that some Parties have come here to bury the SR1.5°C, not to praise it or to learn from it.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Monday, June 17, 2019 - 20:18

And so here we are again! ECO shall never get tired of engaging with you when you are developing critical rules for implementation of Article 6 to ensure environmental integrity and promote sustainable development. 

Today we present our top line recommendations. And for you, true hardcore followers of Article 6, stay tuned!  Over the coming days, we will outline in detail how and why you should implement these asks within Article 6.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Monday, June 17, 2019 - 20:16

Mozambique is reeling after twin cyclones Idai and Kenneth — the first time in recorded history that two strong cyclones hit Mozambique in the same season. The storms killed an estimated 650 people, destroyed 24,000 homes, and displaced 150,000 people. The cyclones affected about 1.8 million people across the country, and women and girls, being the most vulnerable in times of crisis, struggled more than ever to cope with these devastating storms.  

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Monday, June 17, 2019 - 20:14

ECO woke up this morning thinking about the Green Climate Fund (GCF) and how a song by Britney Spears could reference it. Imagine if the song went: “I must confess I still believe (still believe) when I am not with you I lose my mind, give me a sign! Give me Money one more time”. (and the next time and time after that … you get the idea)


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Submitted by ECO Editor on Monday, June 17, 2019 - 20:12

Two crises pose serious threats to life on Earth: the climate change crisis and the biodiversity crisis. Major global intergovernmental assessments from the IPCC and the IPBES have demonstrated that the two crises are strongly interlinked. It is increasingly understood that we must move beyond treating these crises separately, but rather move towards integrated approaches.

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