Eco Digital Blog

Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, May 20, 2016 - 20:18

ECO welcomes the G7 environment ministers’ commitment to develop and communicate their long-term low-GHG emission development strategies “as soon as possible” and before 2020. The G7 should also show leadership by using good long-term planning to bid our carbon-based economies a rapid retirement. Here are six key steps they should take:

1. Take action now

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, May 20, 2016 - 20:16

In Paris, civil society was thrilled to note Parties’ commitment to promote climate education, public participation, public access to information, as well as public awareness and training.

Since the 2012-2020 Doha Work Programme on Article 6, Action for Climate Empowerment (ACE), is subject to a review at this session, ECO came to Bonn looking forward to engaging with Parties in identifying practical proposals to ensure enhanced implementation.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, May 20, 2016 - 20:14

With two women leading the APA now, Ludwig has heard about continuing progress by increasing the number of women leading national delegations at the COPs. Ludwig does have to wonder if he’ll live long enough to witness gender balance at the head of delegation level though. If Parties’ efforts to promote gender balance continue at the same pace, it will take until COP 46 (in 2040!) before half of the delegations will be led by women.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, May 20, 2016 - 20:12
CAN and the City of Bonn has the great pleasure of inviting you to the: CAN Party
Where: Bundesrechnungshof (Kantine), Adenauerallee 81, Trams 16, 61, 62, 66, 67 or 68 to Juridicum or Bundesrechnungshof
When: Tonight, from 9pm until late!
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Submitted by ECO Editor on Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 20:18

What’s your UNFCCC alter-ego? Who do you transform to in the hallways of Bonn, away from home? Are you a hardened late night policy obsessive always ready with a highlighter, or do you prefer to track via Twitter? Take ECO’s latest quiz to find out (answers provided on the back page)!

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 20:16

Judging from conversations overheard in the corridors, developed countries may finally be getting excited about the idea of preparing a 2020 climate finance roadmap. After suggesting this for years,  ECO is in an appreciative mood.

Given the mixed outcomes on finance in Paris, the unmistakable call for such a roadmap is an opportunity to get back on track.

The question now is what the roadmap should contain. Its purpose should be clear: to demonstrate how developed countries will deliver on the promise of US$100 billion a year.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 20:14

If ECO were in the business of writing horoscopes (we are in the business of writing quizzes though!), and if 13 and 40 were numbers to be avoided at all costs then today isn’t a good day for the Arctic.

Both the US and Nordic countries have signed the Paris Agreement and their leaders affirmed they are ready to work on implementation. In fact, at the recent US-Nordic Leaders’ Summit in Washington D.C., they declared that they will work together on managing the Arctic region with an ecosystem-based approach, balancing conservation and sustainable use of the environment.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Wednesday, May 18, 2016 - 20:18

ECO was discouraged by a lack of ambition during Tuesday’s high-level workshop on implementing NDCs, mainly because we know that merely implementing NDCs is nowhere near enough to keep us on a 1.5°C pathway. The commitments on the table urgently need increased ambition. Let’s take a look and see which new-ish governments could take the lead by revising their commitments.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Wednesday, May 18, 2016 - 20:16

To truly kickstart the transition towards 100% renewables by 2050 (at the latest), governments will need to increase global annual renewable energy investments four-fold. That means US$1.3 trillion by 2030, according to IRENA.

You might be thinking: “Whoa, that’s a lot, too much!”. But really, it’s fine — especially when the alternative is taken into account.  The annual costs of climate damages and deadly air pollution from fossil fuels would amount to $4 trillion — costs that mainly would impact the poor.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Wednesday, May 18, 2016 - 20:14

ECO has discovered an opportunity for new friendships! The launch in Paris of the Africa Renewable Energy Initiative (AREI) was a significant outcome of COP21. AREI aims to provide universal energy access for all Africans by implementing 10GW of new renewable capacity by 2020, and doubling the continent’s electricity production through an additional 300GW of renewable capacity by 2030. At COP21, developed countries committed US$10 billion in support by 2020.

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