Eco Digital Blog

Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, December 7, 2018 - 19:18

It seems that some information on clarity, transparency, and understanding of NDCs is playing hide-and-seek. What happened to additional information on mitigation targets under paragraph H in the last iteration? Shouldn’t these targets be clear, transparent and understandable too? ECO is witnessing a scraping of integrity from text on mitigation – which now is completely imbalanced.

So, Parties, who is going to be “it” and seek out this hiding text?

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, December 7, 2018 - 19:16

Everyone knows that CO2 emissions from burning coal are a massive contributor to climate change. Yet there’s confusion about burning wood. In fact, generating a unit of energy from wood emits more CO2 upfront than generating it from coal!

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, December 7, 2018 - 19:14

After a successful decision at COP23 concerning the Local Communities and Indigenous Peoples Platform (LCIPP), negotiations on the LCIPP have been stalled on multiple fronts since the negotiations first started in May at Bonn session.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, December 7, 2018 - 19:12

Climate change is a matter of science and facts, not beliefs or opinions. The science is clear and the facts linked to climate change – like typhoons and droughts – have been so devastating that both secular and faith communities take up their stand to urge political leaders for ambitious climate action.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, December 7, 2018 - 19:10

With a flurry of new texts, ECO was hopeful that Parties had made good progress. But upon closer examination, ECO is very worried. Not content to undermine ambition alone, backsliding continues to broaden its reach to the whole rulebook. With each new APA text, ECO’s worries grow.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, December 7, 2018 - 19:08

In Vanuatu, we relish the good things in life. We in the Pacific Islands love the oceans and the forests of our natural environment, we are raised by our customs, and respect our traditional way of living. We see things and do things in our island fashion, the way that our ancestors, our grandparents, and our parents taught us. With respect for the land we live in, we take good care of our environment. With respect for our future generations, we preserve the resources our environment gives us.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Friday, December 7, 2018 - 19:06


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Submitted by ECO Editor on Thursday, December 6, 2018 - 19:18

There are good surprises and there are bad surprises. The end of the technical phase of the Talanoa Dialogue had a good surprise with some delicious cake to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the IPCC. The latest Warsaw International Mechanism (WIM) text had a bad, down-right horrible surprise. Notwithstanding the fact that we only have 12 years left to avert the climate crisis, all Parties could muster was to ‘note’ the SR1.5! ECO was quite perplexed as Parties have welcomed the last two assessment reports (review 5/CP.13 and 12/CP.20 if you have forgotten).

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Thursday, December 6, 2018 - 19:16

The transfer of innovative climate technologies should help developing countries leapfrog straight to growing in a clean and resilient manner, while addressing issues of sustainable development. The Technology Mechanism has had a head start implementing the Paris Agreement and ECO was happy to see the achievements so far at the Mechanism’s side event as well as events on the work of the Climate Technology Centre of Network (CTCN) and Technology Needs Assessments.

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Submitted by ECO Editor on Thursday, December 6, 2018 - 19:14

Inuit experiences need to start being taken into consideration for the world’s future. When it comes to climate change, seeking our guidance on how to live sustainably will shape what happens to the Arctic. It’s time to listen to Inuit and Indigenous peoples of Canada who have already experienced life-threatening emergencies and are at the front lines of the disaster that is climate change.

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