Tag: Forests-Sinks

Media Advisory – Webcast Notice: Civil society reflections on the key country dynamics, LULUCF, CDM and the big march.

UNFCCC CLIMATE TALKS IN DURBAN:

NGO BRIEFING ON THE NEGOTIATIONS

Civil society reflections on the key country dynamics, LULUCF, CDM and the big march.

[Durban, South Africa] Climate Action Network – International will host a media briefing, webcast live, to outline civil society expectations for a successful outcome of UN climate talks in Durban beginning this week.

International NGO experts will discuss civil society reflections on the new texts of the week, look into the big picture of the first week especially the key country dynamics, discuss the negotiations related to CCS in CDM, investigate LULUCF and highlight the role and reason for the march happening today.

The briefing takes place at the UNFCCC conference venue, on Saturday, December 3, at 12:30 local time (10:30 GMT), Kosi Palm (ICC MR 21 ABCG) NGO Press Conference Room.

It will be webcast live at: http://bit.ly/CANwebcasts

NGO experts on the panel will include: Lamine Ndiaye of Oxfam; Alden Meyer of the Union of Concerned Scientist, Eva Filzmoser of CDM Watch and Melanie Coath of RSPB.
 
What: Briefing on the UNFCCC climate negotiations in Durban

Where: Kosi Palm (ICC MR 21 ABCG) NGO Press Conference Room, UNFCCC conference venue, Durban

Webcast Live via www.unfccc.int, or at: http://bit.ly/CANwebcasts

When: 12:30 local time (10:30 GMT), Saturday, December 3, 2011

Who:     Lamine Ndiaye – Oxfam
    Alden Meyer – The Union of Concerned Scientists
    Eva Filzmoser –CDM Watch
    Melanie Coath – Royal Society for the Protection of Birds

Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 700 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels.  For more information go to: www.climatenetwork.org

For more information please contact:

David Turnbull, CAN International, +27 (0) 78 889 6827 (local mob)

Every day at 18:00 local time CAN gives the Fossil of the Day to the Parties that obstruct the negotiations the most. You can watch the Fossil ceremony at the CAN booth in the DEC building and get the press releases every day at: http://www.climatenetwork.org/fossil-of-the-day

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Time to Get Serious About Loopholes

Here’s a quick reminder: According to the latest UNEP report, the weak pledges from Annex I countries get us only about a third of the estimated emissions reductions that are needed if we want to have a two-in-three chance of avoiding more than 2° C warming. Unfortunately we have even more bad news: loopholes!

Loopholes are weak rules that undermine reduction targets, usually resulting from political bargaining. The largest loopholes are:

  • The carry-over of ‘hot air’ due to the over-allocation of AAUs during the first commitment period.
  • ‘Creative’ accounting rules for forestry and land-use emissions (LULUCF) for Annex I countries.
  • CDM credits from projects that are either over-credited or not additional (would have been built anyway).
  • Double counting – attributing emission reductions to both developed and developing countries.
  • Emissions from aviation and shipping (“bunkers”) currently not accounted for under the Kyoto Protocol.

We took a closer look at the loopholes and compared their total size to the cumulative emission reductions that could be achieved with the current Annex I pledges. We found that the current ‘loopholes’ in the system could negate their pledges.

In the worst case, they could leave Annex I countries with sufficient allowances and credits to revert to a BAU trajectory, and could even enable the carry-over of surplus allowances beyond 2020.

As you can see, a graph says more than 1,000 words. Our findings match those of the UNEP Report, the Stockholm Environment Institute and others.

The size of these current loopholes is staggering. Strong action is required now to effectively and efficiently close these loopholes if we want to preserve the possibility of staying below 2° C warming. 

None of the technical issues around the loopholes are insurmountable.  If developed countries are serious about fulfilling their responsibility to lead the fight against climate change, they need to put ambitious targets on the table that are in line with the science and do away with all these rotten loopholes. 

There is no plan(et) B. Every passing day of inaction closes the door that much further on preventing catastrophic climate change.

Related Newsletter : 

Media Advisory – Webcast Notice: Civil society reflections on the start of the COP17 and the roles of corporations and key Parties.

UNFCCC CLIMATE TALKS IN DURBAN: NGO BRIEFING ON THE NEGOTIATIONS

[Durban, South Africa] Climate Action Network – International will host a media briefing, webcast live, to outline civil society expectations for a successful outcome of UN climate talks in Durban beginning this week.

International NGO experts will discuss civil society reflections on the first couple of days of COP17, look into the finance negotiations, and highlight the country groups that are having positive contributions to the negotiations.

The briefing takes place at the UNFCCC conference venue, on Wednesday, December 1, at 12:30 local time (10:30 GMT), Kosi Palm (ICC MR 21 ABCG) NGO Press Conference Room.

It will be webcast live at: http://bit.ly/CANwebcasts

NGO experts on the panel will include: Raymond Lumbuenamo of WWF, Central Africa; Kelly Dent of Oxfam, and Ilana Solomon of ActionAid USA.
 
What: Briefing on the UNFCCC climate negotiations in Durban

Where: Kosi Palm (ICC MR 21 ABCG) NGO Press Conference Room, UNFCCC conference venue, Durban

Webcast Live via www.unfccc.int, or at: http://bit.ly/CANwebcasts

When: 12:30 local time (10:30 GMT), Wednesday, December 1, 2011

Who:     Raymond Lumbuenamo – WWF, Central Africa
    Kelly Dent - Oxfam
    Ilana Solomon – ActionAid USA

Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 700 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels.  For more information go to: www.climatenetwork.org

For more information please contact:

David Turnbull, CAN International, +27 (0) 78 889 6827 (local mob)

Every day at 18:00 local time CAN gives the Fossil of the Day to the Parties that obstruct the negotiations the most. You can watch the Fossil ceremony at the CAN booth in the DEC building and get the press releases every day at: http://www.climatenetwork.org/fossil-of-the-day

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Media Advisory – Webcast Notice: Civil society reflections on the start of the COP17 and the roles of corporations and key Parties.

UNFCCC CLIMATE TALKS IN DURBAN:

NGO BRIEFING ON THE NEGOTIATIONS

Civil society reflections on the start of the COP17 and the roles of corporations and key Parties.

[Durban, South Africa] Climate Action Network – International will host a media briefing, webcast live, to outline civil society expectations for a successful outcome of UN climate talks in Durban beginning this week.

International NGO experts will discuss civil society reflections on the first days of COP17, look into the country dynamics at Durban, and highlight the impact of corporations on the negotiations.

The briefing takes place at the UNFCCC conference venue, on Wednesday, November 30, at 12:30 local time (10:30 GMT), Kosi Palm (ICC MR 21 ABCG) NGO Press Conference Room.

It will be webcast live at: http://bit.ly/DurbanWebcast

NGO experts on the panel will include: Hans Verolme of National Wildlife Federation; Georgina Woods of CAN Australia, and Ferrial Adam of Greenpeace Africa.
 
What: Briefing on the UNFCCC climate negotiations in Durban

Where: Kosi Palm (ICC MR 21 ABCG) NGO Press Conference Room, UNFCCC conference venue, Durban

Webcast Live via www.unfccc.int, or at: http://bit.ly/CANwebcasts

When: 12:30 local time (10:30 GMT), Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Who:     Hans Verolme – National Wildlife Federation
    Georgina Woods – Climate Action Network Australia
    Ferrial Adam – Greenpeace Africa

Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 700 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels.  For more information go to: www.climatenetwork.org

For more information please contact:

David Turnbull, CAN International, +27 (0) 78 889 6827 (local mobile)

Every day at 18:00 local time CAN gives the Fossil of the Day to the Parties that obstruct the negotiations the most. You can watch the Fossil ceremony at the CAN booth in the DEC building and get the press releases every day at: http://www.climatenetwork.org/fossil-of-the-day

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Region: 

Brazil: Protect Your Forests!

As the world tries to find ways to reduce global emissions, Brazil is on the verge of igniting a real carbon bomb. A bill to change the country’s Forest Law is about to be approved, resulting in the increase of deforestation by reducing protected areas, removing the obligations for the restoration of cleared areas, and pardoning loggers. The proposed bill will be sent to President Dilma Roussef for final consideration in coming weeks.

This proposed change will compromise the National Policy on Climate Change and the emission reduction actions announced by Brazil in 2009 during COP 15. Moreover, Brazil has used the reduction of deforestation rates to justify a position of leadership on environmental issues.  Yet the mere anticipation of approval of the bill has already caused an increase of deforestation. One of the foreseeable  consequences is that an area almost the size of France and Great Britain combined (790,000 km2), will lose legal protection, according to estimates presented by the Brazilian government itself. The negative impacts to the planet’s climate will be incredibly high, as deforestation and land use represent about 75% of Brazilian CO2 emissions.

In light of the fact that Brazil will be hosting the Rio+20 conference next year, the situation becomes even more delicate and embarrassing. In the corridors here in Durban, these developments are causing considerable consternation. The Forest Law was a hot topic during Brazil’s first press conference at COP 17, and the discussion spilled outside the meeting room.

Brazil has historical prominence in the climate negotiations. Therefore, there is certain to be an expectation that President Dilma Roussef will send a clear message to the world showing that Brazil will meet the commitments announced  in Copenhagen, avoiding a stain on the country’s prestige and avoiding setbacks in its environmental policy. It’s up to the President to determine whether she will stop the proposed Forest Law or embrace an imminent tragedy.

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