Tag: Flexible Mechanisms

CAN Intervention on CDM and JI in the COP19 SBI Closing Plenary by Juliane Voigt, 16 November, 2013

Thank you Chair, 

I am Juliane Voigt speaking as a member of the Climate Action Network.

When discussing matters relating to the Kyoto Mechanisms, delegates must remember that the recent IPCC report highlights that the remaining global carbon budget is very small and shrinking fast.

The need to reduce emissions immediately and permanently has never been more vital and urgent. This imperative is in stark contrast with the performance of the CDM and JI to date.

Over two billion offsets have been issued by these Kyoto mechanisms to date. This is a lot. But research shows than only half or fewer of the offsets have resulted in actual emissions reductions. This means that global emissions may have increased by 1 billion tons or more due to these mechanisms.

Given the severe carbon budget restraints we are facing, this is deeply worrying. Both mechanisms need to be fundamentally reformed. We urgently call you to:

·         Reform additionality requirements, including shorten the length of crediting periods and

·         Require net atmospheric benefit in both mechanisms

·         Improve transparency and governance, especially under JI.

·         Last but not least, there should be no issuance of JI offsets during the interim period given that it is still unclear if the second Kyoto commitment period will be ratified by Parties.

Thank you. 

CAN Intervention in the COP19 CMP Plenary on CDM, Agenda Item 4, 13 November, 2013

Thank you Mr. President,

I am Falguni Joshi speaking as a member of the Climate Action Network.

When discussing the matters relating to the Clean Development Mechanism, delegates must remember that the recent IPCC report highlights that the remaining global carbon budget is very small and shrinking fast.

Impacts of climate change are worsening rapidly and the need to reduce emissions immediately and permanently has never been more vital and urgent.

This reality is in stark contrast with the performance of the CDM to date. Recent research shows that it is likely that on the whole, the CDM delivered only 40% of the emission reductions it sold. The CDM has also not delivered on its second goal: to bring sustainable development benefits. During this session, we urgently call to:

  • Fundamentally reform additionality requirements, including shorten the length of crediting periods
  • Exclude large scale power projects and clearly climate damaging technologies such as coal power
  • Establish a grievance mechanism for local stakeholders and ensure that all CDM projects uphold human rights
  • Improve the CDM’s contribution to sustainable development by establishing a monitoring mechanism

Thank you. 

CAN Intervention in the COP19 Workshop under the SBI work programme to further the understanding of the diversity of NAMAs, by Anja Kollmuss, 11 November, 2013

I am Anja Kollmuss speaking as a member of the Climate Action Network.

The recent IPCC report highlights that the remaining global carbon budget is very small and shrinking fast.

Impacts of climate change are worsening rapidly. The need to reduce emissions immediately has never been more vital and urgent.

At the outset CAN stresses that developed countries must lead efforts and raise their mitigation and finance commitments dramatically.

Given the severe carbon budget restraints we are facing, developing countries too must contribute to global mitigation efforts.

17 developing countries have taken on economy-wide targets or committed to NAMAs with specific quantified GHG reduction targets.

We call on other developing countries to follow suit.

34 countries have not yet come forth with any pledges or NAMAs.

32 countries have NAMAs that are not yet specific enough to allow for the quantification of GHG impacts or their implementation.

Together these 66 countries make up a fifth of global CO2 emissions.

We are calling on all developing countries to, inter alia, clearly identify assumptions, and agree to common rules for establishing business as usual baselines and for MRV of mitigation actions.  Developing countries should also articulate how much their mitigation effort could increase with financial and technological support.

The sum of national actions must match the ambition needed, both in the short and in the long‐term.

 

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