Tag: transparency

After an ‘own goal’ on consultation, Brazil is back in the lead

Yesterday, ECO reported that Brazil had failed to consult with Brazilian civil society before submitting its Reference Levels to the UNFCCC, and that it had not yet made the submission public. Today, we are pleased to report that the submission has been published on the Brazilian government website, apparently while yesterday’s article was in press.

Now that the submission is no longer a black box, ECO wants to properly congratulate Brazil on being the first country to submit its reference levels. We hope other countries will soon follow, with due consultation and transparency. While ex-post assessment is no substitute for prior consultation, at least now, the submission can be properly analysed and assessed. Brazil seems to be trying, but needs to work harder to become a role model in transparency and consultation.

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10 Points of Action

Ministers – thank goodness you are here. Your delegations may have been burning some midnight oil in the last few days – but they have left the hard decisions for you! Here’s what your agenda for the next 4 days looks like:

1.  Don’t just “Mind the Gap” – do something! Ministers, at Durban you must show that you live on the same planet as the rest of us and acknowledge that the current mitigation pathway puts us on track for over 4° C warming. You must explicitly acknowledge the 6 to 11 Gigatonne gap, agree to a 2012 work plan to close the gap by increasing developed country targets to at least 40% by 2020, and provide guidelines and timeframes for NAMAs to be registered and supported where required. The ambition work plan must include clear markers through 2012, including submissions, technical papers and a dedicated intersessional meeting, to ensure we don’t have another year of wishy washy workshops with outcomes.

2. Commit for the long term. Negotiators have made no progress at all in setting a peak year and a long term global goal for emissions. Ministers now should explicitly agree that each country contribute their fair share to the globally needed mitigation effort, leading to a peak by 2015 and a reduction of global emissions of at least 80% below 1990 by 2050.

3. Stop spinning wheels in the Review. Ministers need to ensure that the Review will be effective, and limiting the scope will help it get off the ground as an effective instrument. We must focus on the important things: reviewing the long-term goal and the overall progress towards achieving it. Leave the biannual reports under MRV to cover the inputs like the means of implementation.

4. High Time for legally binding. A 5 year long second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol is an absolute necessity as it contains important architectural elements which are crucial to ensure that mitigation commitments are legally binding and have environmental integrity. Nobody believes that a temperature rise of 4° C might be OK. So now is the moment to act decisively. An LCA mandate to agree a comprehensive legally binding instrument can build on the KP. Parties need to go beyond their long stated positions and immediately kick off negotiations toward a comprehensive, fair, ambitious and binding agreement to be agreed no later than 2015.

6. KP is essential – but it must have integrity. When added together, loopholes in the KP could wipe out Annex I ambition for the second commitment period.

In LULUCF, hidden and unaccounted emissions could significantly undermine Annex I targets, and cause us to doubt your commitment. Ministers must therefore ensure emissions from forests and land use are accurately accounted and reject the options on the table with the lowest environmental integrity.

All of the parties to this relationship know that the hot air / carried over AAUs is a bad joke that threatens to sour our relationship.  To keep it pure we need you to retire your surplus AAUs, or at least reduce them to 1%. Flexible mechanisms need clear rules and governance structures to avoid double counting of both emissions and finance, strengthen additionality testing and ensuring the standardization frenzy does not leave us with a highway for free-riders. Let’s start by keeping CCS and nuclear out of the CDM and let’s exclude coal power projects. Last but not least, we do indeed need stakeholder involvement in the CDM. Don’t back down, we are counting on you!

PS: CDM’s little brother JI has been up to a bunch of no-good stuff: hot air gussied up in new clothes (ERUs) is still hot air.

7. Fill the Fund. Operationalising the GCF in Durban is essential but not nearly enough – an empty fund is no good to anyone. We need initial capitalization of the GCF from developed country Parties in Durban. Reaching $100 billion per year by 2020 will require a commitment to scaled up finance from 2013 onward and clear progress on innovative approaches to generate finance. In Durban, parties should move forward on the establishment of mechanisms in the shipping and aviation sectors in a way that reduces emissions, generates finance, and ensures no burdens and costs on developing countries. Countries must also agree to a detailed one year work programme under the UNFCCC to consider a full range of innovative sources of public finance and report back to COP 18 with a proposal for action.

8. Gear Up and Deliver Technology. Technology is heading in the right direction, but speed is needed! Don’t be held back by other laggards. The Tech Mechanism could be operational by the end of COP 18.

9. Feel the Love for Transparency and Stakeholders. Your negotiators excised stakeholders’ right to participate from the IAR text and subject to heavy bracketing in ICA. But we know, Ministers, that you recognize the worth of engaging stakeholders to create a better process – rather than having us only campaign from the outside. Current text also falls short on common accounting rules for Annex I countries and clarification of pledges for all countries. Surely we’ve learned from the financial crisis! Robust reporting, such as Biennial Reviews and Biennial Update Report guidelines, including tables for reporting actions, and a common reporting format for finance must be agreed in Durban, so countries can complete their biennial reports in time for the first review. And where would this relationship between us and the planet, be without compliance for our commitments!

10.  An ambitious adaptation package at the African COP. Good agreements on Loss and Damage and the Nairobi Work Programme have already been reached. Wrapping up the package will require agreement on a strong Adaptation Committee including active civil society observers and direct reporting to the COP (as well to the SBs when COP does not meet). Furthermore, guidelines for National Adaptation Plans for Least Developed Countries must be adopted, plus modalities on how other developing countries can take these up. The prioritisation for LDCs must of course not be undermined.

A strong role for local, affected communities and civil society in national planning processes, building on the principles agreed in the Cancun Adaptation Framework, is essential. Finally, Parties must ensure that the Adaptation Fund does not dry up because of decreasing CER prices and lack of new pledges to the Fund from developed countries.

Region: 
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Russia & Antigua and Barbuda Earn Fossils, Many Nations Receive Joint Ray

On the last day of the United Nations climate negotiations,
countries continued to slow progress toward a fair, ambitious, and binding global
climate agreement, with Russia earning a second place fossil for blocking important
text toward a new climate agreement, and Antigua and Barbuda taking first place for,
on the second day in a row, working to keep civil society's voices out of the
negotiations. On a more positive note, many nations spoke out against Saudi Arabia
and Qatar's efforts to find more ways to be paid for lost oil revenues as the world
moves toward cutting fossil fuels' contribution to climate change.

The Fossils as presented read:

"Russia earns the Second place Fossil. This morning, in the contact group on Shared
Vision and in the LCA plenary, Russia did not accept the Facilitator's note becoming
an INF document. By blocking this note from becoming an INF document, Russia
stopped the negotiations on Shared Vision from moving forward, whereas an
agreement on Shared Vision is a key element of a future legally binding instrument on
climate change."

"Today's First place Fossil award goes to Antigua and Barbuda for standing up, yet
again, against increased transparency and engagement of civil society.

In last night's SBI plenary, Antigua and Barbuda continued to raise concerns about a
number of suggested improvements to transparency. At one point, they even claimed
that because they once couldn't find a seat in a meeting room, they couldn't support
increased openness in this process. Perhaps they should listen to their colleagues in
AOSIS, many of whom stood up to show strong support for NGO participation in
their own statements. Should any delegates from Antigua and Barbuda have difficulty
finding somewhere to sit, any CAN member would gladly give up their seat and stand
in the room, so long as the doors are open.

For Antigua and Barbuda's very confusing and extremely disappointing stance against
transparency and civil society participation, we award them the First place Fossil."
"The Ray of the Day goes to Cook Islands, Tonga, EU, Australia, Norway, Suriname,
Switzerland, Colombia, Tuvalu, Mexico, St. Lucia, USA, Singapore, New Zealand,
Barbados, Bolivia, Japan, & The Gambia for jointly and strongly rejecting the
demand by Saudi Arabia, supported by Qatar, to have response measures included in
the SBI conclusions on loss and damage. As per the Bali Action Plan and the Cancún
agreements, response measures has its place under mitigation and should not be dealt
with when it comes to adaptation to the adverse effects of climate change."
_____________________________________________________________________
About CAN: The Climate Action Network is a worldwide network of roughly 500
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable
levels. www.climatenetwork.org
About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate
talks in 1999  in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations
climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action
Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress
in the negotiations in the last days of talks.
###

Russia & Antigua and Barbuda Earn Fossils, Many Nations Receive Joint Ray

       
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                  17 June 2011
Contact:
Kyle Gracey
kylegracey@gmail.com
+1 814 659 2405

Russia & Antigua and Barbuda Earn Fossils, Many Nations Receive Joint Ray
Bonn, Germany – On the last day of the United Nations climate negotiations,
countries continued to slow progress toward a fair, ambitious, and binding global
climate agreement, with Russia earning a second place fossil for blocking important
text toward a new climate agreement, and Antigua and Barbuda taking first place for,
on the second day in a row, working to keep civil society's voices out of the
negotiations. On a more positive note, many nations spoke out against Saudi Arabia
and Qatar's efforts to find more ways to be paid for lost oil revenues as the world
moves toward cutting fossil fuels' contribution to climate change.

The Fossils as presented read:

"Russia earns the Second place Fossil. This morning, in the contact group on Shared
Vision and in the LCA plenary, Russia did not accept the Facilitator's note becoming
an INF document. By blocking this note from becoming an INF document, Russia
stopped the negotiations on Shared Vision from moving forward, whereas an
agreement on Shared Vision is a key element of a future legally binding instrument on
climate change."

"Today's First place Fossil award goes to Antigua and Barbuda for standing up, yet
again, against increased transparency and engagement of civil society.

In last night's SBI plenary, Antigua and Barbuda continued to raise concerns about a
number of suggested improvements to transparency. At one point, they even claimed
that because they once couldn't find a seat in a meeting room, they couldn't support
increased openness in this process. Perhaps they should listen to their colleagues in
AOSIS, many of whom stood up to show strong support for NGO participation in
their own statements. Should any delegates from Antigua and Barbuda have difficulty
finding somewhere to sit, any CAN member would gladly give up their seat and stand
in the room, so long as the doors are open.For Antigua and Barbuda's very confusing and extremely disappointing stance against transparency and civil society participation, we award them the First place Fossil."

"The Ray of the Day goes to Cook Islands, Tonga, EU, Australia, Norway, Suriname,
Switzerland, Colombia, Tuvalu, Mexico, St. Lucia, USA, Singapore, New Zealand,
Barbados, Bolivia, Japan, & The Gambia
for jointly and strongly rejecting the
demand by Saudi Arabia, supported by Qatar, to have response measures included in
the SBI conclusions on loss and damage. As per the Bali Action Plan and the Cancún
agreements, response measures has its place under mitigation and should not be dealt
with when it comes to adaptation to the adverse effects of climate change."
_____________________________________________________________________
About CAN: The Climate Action Network is a worldwide network of roughly 500
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable
levels. www.climatenetwork.org
About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate
talks in 1999  in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations
climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action
Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress
in the negotiations in the last days of talks.
###

CAN Intervention - SBI Closing Plenary - 17 June, 2011

Thank you Chair,
My name is Sandra Guzman from the Mexican Centre of Environmental Law and I am speaking on behalf of the Climate Action Network.
 
We call on Parties to acknowledge the role of civil society, in the designing of the CDM appeals procedure. The CDM has often been criticized for its inability to reduce emissions and contribute to sustainable development. There lacks effective public participation, and meaningful public participation is a first step to address the wider impacts that flawed CDM projects have on global climate change.

On the other hand, while we heard very positive statements in last week's workshop on NGO engagement, we are disheartened that these words could not be turned into more robust action on this issue. It is extremely unfortunate that some parties seek to hide behind closed doors and turn away from more substantive and productive engagement with civil society. We are here to help, if only parties will allow us. We look forward to continuing discussions on proposals that could not be agreed to here at SBI's next session.

It is now and here where Parties can make the difference.
 
Thank you, Chair.

 

Region: 

A Slew of Fossils and Rays Awarded On Second to Last Day of Bonn Talks

16 June, 2011

A Slew of Fossils and Rays Awarded On Second to Last Day of Bonn Talks
Bonn, Germany – With just over a day left in the United Nations climate change
negotiations here, countries showed they still have plenty of energy left to delay
progress in the fight against climate change, while other nations showed they
recognized how important civil society is in moving the negotiations forward.
Frequent “winner” Saudi Arabia took another Fossil, joined this time by a surprise
blocker, Antigua and Barbuda, for trying to diminish civil society's role in the talks.
Meanwhile, four nations and the European Union earned a rare Ray of the Day for
supporting the very same civil society groups. Both were overshadowed by the fossil
for Japan's renewed refusal to extend its namesake Kyoto Protocol.

The Fossils as presented read:

"The Second place Fossil goes to Saudi Arabia and Antigua and Barbuda for blocking
attempts to enhance NGO participation. Saudi Arabia is a frequent winner of these
awards and really needs no explanation. They have a long history of blocking just
about everything from legal issues to adaptation, agendas to observer participation.
The Saudis should be isolated for their obstructionist ways and not allowed to dictate
text on this or any other issue. As for Antigua & Barbuda, it breaks our heart to give
your individual country the fossil, but to suggest that we would be moving too fast to
allow NGOs to make interventions without submitting written statements in advance
is just ridiculous! In the fight against climate change, speed is of the essence! For
prompting a lack of engagement and transparency, you two get the fossil!"

"Japan earns the First place Fossil. Yesterday, we heard again Japan’s well known
position that it will not inscribe a target under a second period of the Kyoto Protocol
under ANY circumstance. It is very regrettable that we see no room for flexibility.
The Kyoto Protocol second commitment period is the heart of a Durban package and
Japan’s unchanged position will jeopardize the success of the Durban meeting.
Market mechanisms, which Japan favors so much, may not be used anymore if Japan
doesn’t have a target under the Kyoto Protocol. Is this really OK, Japan? Lack of a
target under the international legal framework would weaken implementation of
domestic policies and actions and lose international competitiveness in a low carbon
economy. We don’t really understand."  

"The Ray of the Day goes to a group of countries who have stood strong for
transparency in the face of attacks from countries hoping to hide behind closed doors.
They clearly recognize the productive and important role NGOs play in this process
and have done all they can to suggest improvements, propose compromises, and shine
a light on this process in the hopes of supporting not only civil society but in so doing
also the global effort to address climate change. On a side note, if more Parties had
similar positions on transparency to these, perhaps we could avoid protracted fights
on agendas and other matters in the future, simply in order to avoid embarrassment.
For these actions in support of transparency, accountability and civil society, we
award this Ray of the Day to the EU, Mexico, Bolivia, Philippines, and Australia."
_____________________________________________________________________
About CAN: The Climate Action Network is a worldwide network of roughly 500
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable
levels. www.climatenetwork.org
About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate
talks in 1999  in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations
climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action
Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress
in the negotiations in the last days of talks.

###

Topics: 
Region: 

A Slew of Fossils and Rays Awarded On Second to Last Day of Bonn Talks

       
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                  16 June 2011
Contact:
Kyle Gracey
kylegracey@gmail.com
+1 814 659 2405


A Slew of Fossils and Rays Awarded On Second to Last Day of Bonn Talks

Bonn, Germany – With just over a day left in the United Nations climate change
negotiations here, countries showed they still have plenty of energy left to delay
progress in the fight against climate change, while other nations showed they
recognized how important civil society is in moving the negotiations forward.
Frequent “winner” Saudi Arabia took another Fossil, joined this time by a surprise
blocker, Antigua and Barbuda, for trying to diminish civil society's role in the talks.
Meanwhile, four nations and the European Union earned a rare Ray of the Day for
supporting the very same civil society groups. Both were overshadowed by the fossil
for Japan's renewed refusal to extend its namesake Kyoto Protocol.

The Fossils as presented read:

"The Second place Fossil goes to Saudi Arabia and Antigua and Barbuda for blocking
attempts to enhance NGO participation
. Saudi Arabia is a frequent winner of these
awards and really needs no explanation. They have a long history of blocking just
about everything from legal issues to adaptation, agendas to observer participation.
The Saudis should be isolated for their obstructionist ways and not allowed to dictate
text on this or any other issue. As for Antigua & Barbuda, it breaks our heart to give
your individual country the fossil, but to suggest that we would be moving too fast to
allow NGOs to make interventions without submitting written statements in advance
is just ridiculous! In the fight against climate change, speed is of the essence! For
prompting a lack of engagement and transparency, you two get the fossil!"

"Japan earns the First place Fossil. Yesterday, we heard again Japan’s well known
position that it will not inscribe a target under a second period of the Kyoto Protocol
under ANY circumstance. It is very regrettable that we see no room for flexibility.
The Kyoto Protocol second commitment period is the heart of a Durban package and
Japan’s unchanged position will jeopardize the success of the Durban meeting.
Market mechanisms, which Japan favors so much, may not be used anymore if Japan
doesn’t have a target under the Kyoto Protocol. Is this really OK, Japan? Lack of a
target under the international legal framework would weaken implementation of
domestic policies and actions and lose international competitiveness in a low carbon
economy. We don’t really understand."  

"The Ray of the Day goes to a group of countries who have stood strong for
transparency in the face of attacks from countries hoping to hide behind closed doors.
They clearly recognize the productive and important role NGOs play in this process

and have done all they can to suggest improvements, propose compromises, and shine
a light on this process in the hopes of supporting not only civil society but in so doing
also the global effort to address climate change. On a side note, if more Parties had
similar positions on transparency to these, perhaps we could avoid protracted fights
on agendas and other matters in the future, simply in order to avoid embarrassment.
For these actions in support of transparency, accountability and civil society, we
award this Ray of the Day to the EU, Mexico, Bolivia, Philippines, and Australia."
_____________________________________________________________________
About CAN: The Climate Action Network is a worldwide network of roughly 500
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable
levels. www.climatenetwork.org


About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate
talks in 1999  in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations
climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action
Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress
in the negotiations in the last days of talks.

###

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