Tag: ray of the day

Germany and Australia Win Fossils, While G77 Gets a Ray

Fossil Germany Ray G77 COP 23

A Short-sighted Germany Goes Off Target

Our first Fossil goes to Germany for increasing its emissions in 2017 and risking missing its 2020 targets for emission reductions.

Germany, our hospitable host, where did you go wrong?

Is this the same country that provided funding to the Adaptation Fund last week? The so called "climate chancellor" who got G7 leaders to agree to decarbonize the global economy?

Even our tired brains know that yes, it is the same country and that same chancellor! But somehow in the middle of all this, the German government seems to have forgotten about the most important part of being a climate leader: reducing your emissions. 

There’s no arguing with science (though some do try); if your emissions go up, temperatures will not go down and if your fossil fuel use goes up, you will not decarbonize the global economy.

The preliminary emissions statistics for Germany for 2017 were just released and they are not pretty. German greenhouse gas emissions are going to increase this year, due to an increase in oil, natural gas, and lignite consumption. German emissions have not decreased since 2009. Chancellor Merkel's successive governments have failed to address climate change at home for years. The Chancellor has preferred to listen to the fossil fuel industry, energy intensive companies, and the powerful carmakers, rather than the people who demand strong climate action. Germany is currently projected to dramatically miss its domestic 2020 target of 40% emissions reductions - unless the next government acts decisively and shuts down coal fired power plants and also begins a low-carbon transition in the transport, industry and agriculture sector. 

Germany, be the leader that you claim to be!

 

Australia Continues to Play Dirty

Another day, another Fossil for Australia – someone seems to be keen on earning the colossal Fossil!

In a continuing show of being the biggest bully on the playground, yesterday, at a joint session on Loss and Damage, negotiators were debating about increasing the resources of the WIM (Warsaw International Mechanism) and exploring new and innovative sources for support, which would give a stronger voice to the most vulnerable countries on earth. However, Australia proposed to eliminate the two most important outcomes that the G77 was pushing for. 

Rather than being constructive and proposing solutions to allow a clear process on loss and damage, Australia proposed to delete two essential paragraphs: paragraph 8, which included the creation of a permanent item for discussion about issues related to Loss and Damage under the SBI and paragraph 18 which was an opportunity to explore sources of finance. What’s more is Australia made the proposal, while the G77 coordinator was struggling to find consensus and agreement from superiors. 

Australia’s attitude shows a sense of disregard for the important discussion on loss and damage. But hey, were we expecting a better attitude from you? 

 

The G77 Shines a Ray on Loss and Damage

The developing country group, G77 wins today’s ray of the day award for joining together to stand up for vulnerable country members facing the worst impacts of climate change, in the face of fierce opposition from rich countries.  

Joel Suarez Orozco, as the coordinator for G77, has, for the first time since Warsaw, brought together the group and has furthered the case for vulnerable countries to receive the support they deserve – in addition to pushing the loss and damage body to get a mandate from the COP that will allow it to be effective.

In particular, a major contribution was made to the preamble, which states that Parties note with concern the increased frequency and severity of climate-related disasters. This provided a concrete reference for confronting realities and not allowing those in Annex 1 countries to duck away.

The G77 is standing behind those most vulnerable – the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) and Small Island Developing States (SIDS), however this wasn’t enough to convince the big bullies of Australia and the US.

When asked about the recent climate-related disasters and increased impacts, Australia acknowledged the events, but questioned if it was due to climate change. Mr. Orozco was quick to counter with an impassioned plea, “When your island is destroyed when the roof of your house is gone, you know it´s climate change.”

At this Pacific COP, we cannot ignore those that are the most vulnerable, we must take a stand.

 

About CAN: The Climate Action Network (CAN) is a worldwide network of over 1100 Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) in more than 120 working to promote government and individual action to limit human induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. www.climatenetwork.org 

About the Fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate talks in 1999, in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress in the negotiations or in the implementation of the Paris Agreement

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It's a Ray for Those Still In

First Week 1 Monday COP 23

Today’s Opening Day Fossil of the Day is in fact …. a ‘Ray of the Day’ (not least to bring in some sunshine into a rain-sodden COP in Bonn though we are grateful for the images of sunny Fiji donning the walls of this fantastic two-zone venue).

The proverbial sunshine is inside the halls of the COP – the amazing spirit of the people present here from countries far and wide, committed to the task on hand: to move forward with implementing the Paris Agreement and staying focused on driving forward climate action.

Undeterred by talk of a Certain Someone with an incurable tweeting habit, their actions here speak louder than words: “We are still in and we are working towards a better future that makes our world safer, healthier and more prosperous for all and those to come”. 

Today’s Ray of the Day celebrates your achievements in the face of some very dark and flippant times. So stay on the path we have forged from Paris and keep your eyes on the horizon rather than the bumps in the road.

About CAN: The Climate Action Network (CAN) is a worldwide network of over1100 Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) in more than 120 working to promote government and individual action to limit human induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. www.climatenetwork.org 

About the Fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate talks in 1999, in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress in the negotiations or in the implementation of the Paris Agreement.

About the Rays: CAN, gives out the 'Ray of The Day' award to the countries who are a ray of hope over the past days of negotiations at the UN climate change conference. 

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Let’s Count the Ways the Polish Government Earned The Fossil of the Day, while the Polish People Deserve Only Rays

Fossil of the Day, COP19, Warsaw, 12.11.2013

      
Photo Credit: David Tong, Adopt A Negotiator

The list of reasons to award Poland as the first place fossil is probably the longest any country has ever earned. 

Reason 1: Continuously opposing the European Union from taking more ambitious climate action

Reason 2: Co-hosting a Coal Summit coinciding with the COP but not organizing any debate on renewable energy opportunities

Reason 3: Inviting polluting companies that openly oppose an ambitious climate action to sponsor the COP

Reason 4: Allowing the dirty side of European industry, Business Europe, to represent the business voice at the pre-COP

Reason 5: Writing mad postings on the official COP19 website about the economic opportunities the melting Arctic will bring as well as chasing the “pirates, ecologists and terrorists” on the sea

Reason 6: Presenting delegates with standard climate denialist rhetoric through their mobile device app, repeating the old chestnut that “climate changes are natural phenomena, which occured (sic) many times on Earth”.

Poland, it is not ok to misuse your position as a COP President to advance your own coal agenda. Stop it.

Ray of the Day for the Renewable Energy Loving Polish People

The Polish government is holding the world back and acting as the PR department of the coal industry.

But the Polish people want to grasp a renewable future, not be stuck in a coal-based past. No less than 89% of Polish citizens want more energy to come from renewable sources and more than two-thirds of Polish people (70%) want an energy policy that gives support to renewables. 73% of Polish people want Poland to be more involved in global actions to prevent the negative effects of climate change. 

With this ray we say: Thank you, Poles, for supporting a future without climate chaos. It is about time that Prime Minister Tusk and his government listen to their people and go for an energy revolution based on energy efficiency and renewables. All renewable power to the Polish people.

 

About CAN: The Climate Action Network (CAN) is a worldwide network of over 850 Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) in more than 100 working to promote government and individual action to limit human0induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. www.climatenetwork.org 

About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate talks in 1999, in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress in the negotiations in the last days of talks.

About the rays: CAN, gives out the 'Ray of The Day' award to the countries who are a ray of hope over the past days of negotiations at the UN climate change conference. This ‘Ray of Solidarity’ is in the same spirit.

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Australia’s Empty Purse Earns First Fossil of COP19, with Special Solidarity Ray of the Day for Philippines in the Face of Typhoon Devastation.

Fossil of the Day, COP19, Warsaw 11.11.2013

                                

Many would have thought that Australia’s position couldn’t have got much worse after the dismantling of its climate change department, ridding itself of the burden of a climate change minister and intending to remove its carbon price during COP.  But we thought wrong.

Yesterday, the media revealed that Australia will not be putting forward any new finance commitments at the Warsaw negotiations, beyond their old Fast Start Finance commitments. This has earned Canberra COP19’s very first Fossil of the Day.

The Australian Government’s stance is despite the crushing losses suffered by the Philippines this week, a country who is a Pacific neighbor to Australia and needs international finance to insure against future tragedy. This is a glaring illustration of Australia’s lack of understanding of the purpose of climate finance.

To top it off, Australian cabinet ministers characterize climate finance as ‘socialism masquerading as environmentalism’ – we have news for you, it’s not socialism, its equity and it's your responsibility.

Special recognition today, the Ray of the Solidarity, goes to the Philippines.

Today, just as we have heard with sadness and great frustration Australia’s intentions not to increase its climate financing, we also heard from the Philippines lead negotiator, Yeb Sano, who addressed the opening session of the UN climate negotiations, calling for urgent action to prevent a repeat of the devastating storm that hit parts of his country this past weekend. Super Typhoon Haiyan was like nothing the world has ever experienced.

During his speech Sano thanked civil society, especially those who are risking their lives climbing oil rigs in the Arctic, trying to stop the building of new oil pipelines, or taking any direct action against the dirty fossil fuel industry.

To this we say to Sano and the rest of the countries of the world, civil society has never felt the urgency of action as much as we do now, and we guarantee that we will never lose our passion, motivation, and determination to achieve a change in light of these and many other events.

We stand in solidarity with the Philippines and all other nations that were hit by this devastation. We urge the international community to act here in Warsaw to reduce the threat of climate change and push towards a new, globally-binding agreement in 2015.

We would like to have a moment of silence as a symbol of our solidarity, and invite you all to hold hands and stand with us.

About CAN: The Climate Action Network (CAN) is a worldwide network of over 850 Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) in more than 100 working to promote government and individual action to limit human0induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. www.climatenetwork.org 

About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate talks in 1999, in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress in the negotiations in the last days of talks.

About the rays: CAN, gives out the 'Ray of The Day' award to the countries who are a ray of hope over the past days of negotiations at the UN climate change conference. This ‘Ray of Solidarity’ is in the same spirit.

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Busy Fossil Awards Target U.S., New Zealand, Japan, Canada, Russia; Africa Group Earns Ray

Durban, South Africa – It was the busiest Fossil ceremony yet at COP17. New Zealand took third for opposing the Kyoto Protocol. Japan, Canada, and Russia earned second for their own lack of KP commitment. And the United States came in first for failing their 2 degrees C agreement. Luckily, the Africa Group earned the first Ray of the Day in Durban for consistent, constructive progress. If only the negotiations were so productive. The Fossils as presented read:

“New Zealand takes 3rd place in today's Fossil of the Day for hardening its stance on the Kyoto Protocol. In the last 24 hours, New Zealand's previous conditional support of a second commitment period under the Kyoto Protocol appears to have become outright opposition. However, New Zealand has declined to answer questions or otherwise clarify its position on this issue, leading to ongoing uncertainty.”

"Japan, Canada, and Russia earn the 2nd place Fossil. We heard today and yesterday from all these ministers repeating their position on rejecting the 2nd commitment period for the Kyoto Protocol.

For what are they coming to Durban? Didn't they see people with I love KP T shirts? They are the ones who block progress on the AWG-KP discussion for a long time, and that makes the Durban agreement more difficult now. As one delegate said, they are not leaving Kyoto to make things better, but worse.

As a response to global climate change, and as big emitters, leaving Kyoto is totally irresponsible."

"The United States of America wins the 1st place Fossil. The COP is not even over, and the United States has managed to secure what ought to be the Fossil of the 21st Century. Why? Well, not only are they the largest emitter of greenhouse gas pollution in history, not only have they occupied more atmospheric space than any other country, not only have they got the most paltry emissions reduction pledge for 2020, not only did they renege on ratifying the Kyoto Protocol, but they are now reneging on their commitment to keeping warming below 2 degrees above pre-industrial temperatures.

In yesterday's press briefing, Todd Stern was asked to clarify reports that he had described the 2 degree goal as “aspirational.” His answer? That knowing ahead of time that we will overshoot the warming limit that the IPCC has identified as the point after which the globe and all of its people are thrust into out-of-control climate change did not amount to 'some kind of mandatory obligation to change what you’re doing, whether you are in the United States or Europe, China or wherever you might be…'

For these comments, which amount to a callous disregard for the future lives and livelihoods of people everywhere… for repeatedly stating at this meeting that no one should increase the ambition of their pledge… for their willingness to throw away the last opportunity we have for keeping the two degree goal within reach, the United States earns what ought to be the title Fossil of the 21st Century."

"The Africa Group earns a Ray of the Day. At this Durban COP/CMP the Africa Group has clearly made a big effort to be proactive and progressive. The Africa Group have put forward proposals that would reduce the loopholes that threaten to undermine mitigation pledges from developed countries. Africa Group have put forward proposals to improve the environmental integrity of accounting in land use and forestry (LULUCF) by limiting free forestry credits to Annex 1 parties and significantly reduce the ‘hot air’ (carried over AAUs). (of course extinguishing it altogether would be best!). Yesterday the Africa Group put forward a proposal under shared vision to establish a process to address equity, which if it is teamed with a commitment to agree a peak year of 2015 and a long term global goal to reduce emissions by 80% by 2050 could help unlock negotiations here, and also encourage country specific longer term ambitious mitigation actions."
 

Japan Takes First Place Fossil Of The Day Award At Panamá Climate Talks, While Denmark Receives The Ray Of The Day

First place Fossil is awarded to Japan. About 7 months ago, Japan experienced one of the most dreadful tragedies in the country's history. The country is still in the process of recovering from the damage caused by the earthquake and tsunami. The nuclear accident in Fukushima certainly destroyed the myth that nuclear power is safe and clean. And yet, the country seems to have failed to learn an important lesson from the accident. In the KP spin-off group meeting yesterday, the country again rejected to drop the option to include nuclear in CDM. The position was also supported by India. This means the country still wants to export the technology that brought tremendous hardship upon its own nation to developing countries and then earn credits from this.
It is inappropriate, irresponsible and even morally wrong, given the fact that the Fukushima reactors are still in a very dangerous situation and the residents are still in heavily contaminated areas. In addition, the technology does not fit one of the dual objectives of CDM, which is to contribute to sustainable development. We sincerely hope the country come to sense, drop the proposal and work "against" it.

Saudi Arabia gets the 2nd place Fossil of the Day for insisting on the inclusion of response measures in the negotiation-text of the Adaptation Committee. Setting up negotiation chips is one thing, but using the same (wrong) old story again and again is another. Adaptation is not the place to negotiate response measures. Saudi Arabia we want change.

The Danish government announcement to reduce the Danish emissions 40% by year in 2020 earns Denmark the Ray of the Day. NGOs from around the world greeted this announcement with joy and excitement, “a new page has turned in Denmark’s climate politics. From now on when we say ‘Denmark’ we will smile. When before - we did not.” Also worth noting is that the brand new Danish government, as one of the first acts, sacked Bjorn Lomborg from his post as a government advisor. We hope that this also marks a new dawn for the EU’s delayed effort to move to a 30% target and will be followed up by other countries upping their pledges to the higher end of their range as Durban approaches.
 

Photo Credit: Adopt a Negotiator

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