Tag: Nuclear

CAN Position: Sustainable Energy World Without Nuclear Power, March 2015

Key points

  • Nuclear power is socially, environmentally and economically unsustainable. Nuclear energy has no role to play in a fully decarbonized power sector in transition to phasing out all fossil fuel emissions and phasing in a 100% renewable energy future with sustainable energy access for all, as early as possible, but not later than 2050.
  • Any climate agreement such as the one to be agreed in Paris in December 2015 must prioritize its efforts for climate change mitigation within the energy sector on sustainable renewable energy and energy efficiency. Governments should not incentivize or rely on nuclear power in their mitigation planning including within their INDCs.
  • Nuclear power as an inherently unsustainable energy source shall not be eligible under any existing or new GHG compliance market mechanism for any carbon credits.
  • Nuclear power is not fit for any climate finance and therefore shall also be barred from receiving any financial support under either international or bilateral co-operations such as IFI, the GCF or ODA.

Therefore, CAN calls on all governments that have or are planning new nuclear power installation, to swiftly shift away from these investments toward safe, clean, appropriate and sustainable renewable energy.

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Well done Germany, what about coal?

ECO was delighted to hear that Germany has decided to stop export credit guarantees for nuclear installations abroad. Well done to our hosts – but here’s our first question: why did it take 13 years to draw the logical consequence from the 2001 decision to phase-out nuclear power? Only three years ago, the conservative-liberal government tried to mobilise another €1.3 billion export guarantee for Areva to build the Angra-3 nuclear reactor in Brazil. Only a strong refusal by Parliament and civil society stopped this crazy plan.

Today, Germany has become the country of the Energiewende, and wants to be seen as the front-runner in clean energy. Renewable energy is speeding up and it has already reached a 27% share of electricity. Renewable energy is seen as the backbone of Germany’s efforts to reach its national GHG reduction targets of 40% by 2020 and 55% by 2030.  Energy efficiency also needs a similar emphasis.

So, dear German government, if you have decided that renewables are the way to go, here is ECO’s second question: Why are you stopping export guarantees for nuclear, but still giving export credits to coal power plants all over the planet?

Between 2007 and 2013, developed countries collectively provided US$36 billion to coal through their national export credit agencies. With export credits worth nearly $3 billion, Germany places third in this dirty league table. The state-owned development bank KfW is the driver of such coal support.

The US, UK, Netherlands and several Nordic countries, as well as the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development and the European Investment Bank have decided to end or strictly limit their support for coal overseas. Meanwhile, KfW continues to give credits to coal power plants and infrastructure worldwide, to the tune of at least €2 billion. This means that high emission infrastructure is locked in for decades, undermining the goal to decarbonise energy supply as fast as possible.

In October 2013, the OECD Secretary General Angel Gurría asked “every government” to question domestic and overseas support for coal. The UN Secretary General’s Climate Summit in September in New York is the perfect moment for Germany and other developed countries to announce the end of their support for coal power plants and fossil fuel infrastructure. Germany should not wait another 13 years to draw conclusions that can help to save the planet.

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Aren’t You Lowering Ambition, Japan?

Japan will soon make a decision on new energy and climate policy in light of the Fukushima nuclear accident. ECO supports the voices of the majority of Japanese people, who say, “No, thank you” to nuclear. Nuclear is not a solution.

However, we realized with surprise, Japan considered that mitigation is not possible without nuclear. Believe it or not, the projection of GHG pollution in 2020 for Japan is from 0% to -7% from 1990 levels when Japan chooses a nuclear-free future. This is nearly at the level of the first commitment period Kyoto target (-6%)! Is nuclear really a mitigation solution? ECO believes NOT. Japan could surely reduce CO2 while reducing its dependence on nuclear. Rather, it’s better and faster to realise a low-carbon society through shifting the tremendous nuclear investments to renewables and energy efficiency.

ECO is anxious to know whether Japan intends to discuss raising ambition as a matter of urgency. We have no time to delay. No room to lower efforts. In the last session in Bonn, ECO urged Japan to reaffirm its 25% reduction target by 2020 in Bangkok. Your silence is deafening. So, take the ambition discussion back home, identify any possible reduction potentials other than nuclear (here's a preview – you will find a lot) and come back with an ambitious target. Through that, Japan could make a sizeable contribution to Doha and to the world by transitioning toward a safe, low carbon economy. The international community is watching you.

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And a note to Japan: contrary to what you stated in Sunday's 1(b)(i) workshop, double counting of credits IS a VERY big problem. A 1-2 GtCO2e bit problem, according to the UNEP Bridging the Emissions Gap Report, “if double counting of emissions reductions by developed and developing countries due to the use of the carbon market is not ruled out, and if the additionality of CDM projects is not improved." ECO reminds Japan that they noted (here it comes again) – with grave concern – the existence and size of the gap. Japan needs to do its part to close it – and avoiding double counting is a an important part of that.

 

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Unlearned Lessons From Fukushima

ECO cannot stop wondering; what will it take to make Japan come to its senses? Nuclear is neither safe nor clean. If the ongoing, dreadful tragedies in Fukushima cannot make this simple fact clear, what will it take?

And still, in the KP spin off group meeting yesterday, Japan, supported by India, once again refused to drop the option to include nuclear in CDM. This means the country still wants to  get credits for exporting  to developing countries the very technology that brought such tremendous hardship upon its own people.

This is inappropriate, irresponsible and even morally wrong.

The country still has not been able to stabilize the reactors and has not been able to take care of the residents in the heavily contaminated areas, nor dispose of radioactive waste arising from decontamination and from water treatment sludge.

How can Japan take this position in the midst of the nuclear crisis?

Just as a reminder, this technology does not fit one of the objectives of CDM, which is to contribute to sustainable development.

It is time for all Parties to make a simple decision: drop the option to "include nuclear in CDM." The world expresses great disapproval towards the Japanese position of continuing to promote nuclear in the aftermath of the Fukushima disaster.  

Japan Takes First Place Fossil Of The Day Award At Panamá Climate Talks, While Denmark Receives The Ray Of The Day

First place Fossil is awarded to Japan. About 7 months ago, Japan experienced one of the most dreadful tragedies in the country's history. The country is still in the process of recovering from the damage caused by the earthquake and tsunami. The nuclear accident in Fukushima certainly destroyed the myth that nuclear power is safe and clean. And yet, the country seems to have failed to learn an important lesson from the accident. In the KP spin-off group meeting yesterday, the country again rejected to drop the option to include nuclear in CDM. The position was also supported by India. This means the country still wants to export the technology that brought tremendous hardship upon its own nation to developing countries and then earn credits from this.
It is inappropriate, irresponsible and even morally wrong, given the fact that the Fukushima reactors are still in a very dangerous situation and the residents are still in heavily contaminated areas. In addition, the technology does not fit one of the dual objectives of CDM, which is to contribute to sustainable development. We sincerely hope the country come to sense, drop the proposal and work "against" it.

Saudi Arabia gets the 2nd place Fossil of the Day for insisting on the inclusion of response measures in the negotiation-text of the Adaptation Committee. Setting up negotiation chips is one thing, but using the same (wrong) old story again and again is another. Adaptation is not the place to negotiate response measures. Saudi Arabia we want change.

The Danish government announcement to reduce the Danish emissions 40% by year in 2020 earns Denmark the Ray of the Day. NGOs from around the world greeted this announcement with joy and excitement, “a new page has turned in Denmark’s climate politics. From now on when we say ‘Denmark’ we will smile. When before - we did not.” Also worth noting is that the brand new Danish government, as one of the first acts, sacked Bjorn Lomborg from his post as a government advisor. We hope that this also marks a new dawn for the EU’s delayed effort to move to a 30% target and will be followed up by other countries upping their pledges to the higher end of their range as Durban approaches.
 

Photo Credit: Adopt a Negotiator

Japan Takes First Place Fossil Of The Day Award At Panamá Climate Talks, While Denmark Receives The Ray Of The Day

Photo Credit: Adopt A Negotiator

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                     3 October 2011
Panamá City, Panamá

Contact:
David Turnbull
dturnbull@climatenetwork.org
Home mobile: +12023162499
Local mobile: (+507) 64751851

Japan Takes First Place Fossil Of The Day Award At Panamá Climate Talks, While Denmark Receives The Ray Of The Day.

First place Fossil is awarded to Japan. About 7 months ago, Japan experienced one of the most dreadful tragedies in the country's history. The country is still in the process of recovering from the damage caused by the earthquake and tsunami. The nuclear accident in Fukushima certainly destroyed the myth that nuclear power is safe and clean. And yet, the country seems to have failed to learn an important lesson from the accident. In the KP spin-off group meeting yesterday, the country again rejected to drop the option to include nuclear in CDM. The position was also supported by India. This means the country still wants to export the technology that brought tremendous hardship upon its own nation to developing countries and then earn credits from this.
It is inappropriate, irresponsible and even morally wrong, given the fact that the Fukushima reactors are still in a very dangerous situation and the residents are still in heavily contaminated areas. In addition, the technology does not fit one of the dual objectives of CDM, which is to contribute to sustainable development. We sincerely hope the country come to sense, drop the proposal and work "against" it.

Saudi Arabia gets the 2nd place Fossil of the Day for insisting on the inclusion of response measures in the negotiation-text of the Adaptation Committee. Setting up negotiation chips is one thing, but using the same (wrong) old story again and again is another. Adaptation is not the place to negotiate response measures. Saudi Arabia we want change.

The Danish government announcement to reduce the Danish emissions 40% by year in 2020 earns Denmark the Ray of the Day. NGOs from around the world greeted this announcement with joy and excitement, “a new page has turned in Denmark’s climate politics. From now on when we say ‘Denmark’ we will smile. When before - we did not.” Also worth noting is that the brand new Danish government, as one of the first acts, sacked Bjorn Lomborg from his post as a government advisor. We hope that this also marks a new dawn for the EU’s delayed effort to move to a 30% target and will be followed up by other countries upping their pledges to the higher end of their range as Durban approaches.

About CAN: The Climate Action Network (CAN) is a worldwide network of roughly 700 Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and individual action to limit human0induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. www.climatenetwork.org  

About the Fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate talks in 1999, in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress in the negotiations in the last days of talks.  

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Fossil of the Day Awards - Bonn - June 14, 2011: India Earns First place (and only) Fossil of the Day

       
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                  14 June 2011
Contact:
Kyle Gracey
kylegracey@gmail.com
+1 814 659 2405


India Earns First place (and only) Fossil of the Day

Bonn, Germany – Alone among countries shamed for doing the most to block
progress in the United Nations climate negotiations today, India earned the first and
only place Fossil for supporting nuclear power as a “clean” option
under the UN's
Clean Development Mechanism, 3 months and 3 days after the Fukushima crisis.

The Fossil as presented read:

“The first place fossil goes to India for supporting the inclusion of nuclear energy in
the Clean Development Mechanism in Monday's AWG-KP mechanism spin-off
group. In the wake of the Fukushima nuclear disaster, we don't understand why
anyone would want to go down that expensive and dangerous path when other
options, such as renewables, are available. The CDM is supposed to support
sustainable development, so let's develop safely, sustainably and in a climate-friendly
way.”
_____________________________________________________________________
About CAN: The Climate Action Network is a worldwide network of roughly 500
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable
levels. www.climatenetwork.org

About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate
talks in 1999  in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations
climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action
Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress
in the negotiations in the last days of talks.

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