Tag: NGO participation

Get Smart About PaperSmart

ECO looks forward to contributing to the success of the Warsaw COP and rejoices at being able to play its part once again contributing to the acuteness of the discussions. Since time immemorial (or maybe it just feels that way), ECO has tried to enrich each negotiating session. We look forward to a PaperSmart conference, but hopefully not so "smart" as to prevent ECO's opinions and insights from reaching delegates searching for inspiration.

Related Newsletter : 

Civil Society's Voice Being Marginalized

 

ECO has been pondering the evident marginalization of the ‘civil society voice’ lately and started scribbling a few preambular thoughts on a serviette…

  • Reaffirming that vibrant public participation “allows vital experience, expertise, information and perspectives from civil society to be brought into the process to generate new insights and approaches”1;
  • Acknowledging the respectful, positive and constructive dialogue at the December 1 ADP Special Event;
  • Encouraging Parties and the Secretariat to provide roundtables and other opportunities to enhance the full inclusion of civil society as a relevant and meaningful voice in these negotiations; . . .

    #Operative text... 

 1Guidelines for participation of representative of NGOs at meetings of the bodies of the UNFCCC.

Related Newsletter : 

CAN Intervention in the COP18 SBI Informal Consultations: Article 6, 27 November, 2012

 

 

SBI Intervention in the Informal Consultations: Article 6

27 November, 2012

 

Thank you chair for giving me the floor.

Good morning,

My name is Farrukh Zaman and I will speak on behalf of CAN international.

The six themes included in the scope of the article 6 work program are crucial to the implementation of the convention and to successful and effective climate policies at the national level.

We see the adoption of a new work program as a key opportunity to build on the amended work program and to strengthen each of its 6 thematic pillars.

Considering that the new work program will last for the upcoming 8 years, it is very important to us to ensure that the work programme propose a strengthened approach to each of the thematic issues covered by the work program.

Considering the diversity of issues represented, we believe that structuring the work program in two parallel streams would help improve the focus and qualitative outputs of any activity taking place within the frame of this work program, as well as make the most of the participation of experts and stakeholders to the work program.

We would thus suggest to create a work stream on

education, public awareness and training on the one hand

and on public participation and access to information other hand.

Finally, we see an important opportunity for the work program to support parties in the implementation of the convention. The work program could thus provide an opportunity to exchange best practices and provide guidance to parties on how they include stakeholders in the preparation of national negotiating positions and of national communications.

We would look forward to engage with parties delegates during the coming days.

Thank you

 

 


 

 

On The Outside Looking In

 

Dear delegates,

Let us share with you our confusion.  We are very happy to hear your heart-warming reports of the added value that we as civil society bring to this process.  However, we are slightly discouraged by the fact that we are often not allowed in the rooms where the real negotiations are taking place.

The rules on observer participation promote that all negotiating sessions are open to observers in both contact groups and informals. The spirit of the SBI discussions over the past years led us to believe that we might expect to enter the rooms. When the doors are closed to us, we call on all parties in the room to systematically ask their colleagues whether there is a compelling reason preventing the holding of a transparent session.

The graph below demonstrates the stark reality NGOs faced last just June. Despite the SBI encouraging enhanced participation, civil society spent a significant amount of time wandering aimlessly through the Maritim corridors, engaging in more conversations with the ghosts of classical musicians its room are named for than with negotiators. (Though ECO is quick to note that Listz's views on technology transfer are particularly nuanced.)

You can trust us, we are currently MRVing the compliance of parties' commitment to “openness, transparency and inclusiveness”. Because, really, there is only so much one can observe from the corridors.

Related Newsletter : 

Russia & Antigua and Barbuda Earn Fossils, Many Nations Receive Joint Ray

On the last day of the United Nations climate negotiations,
countries continued to slow progress toward a fair, ambitious, and binding global
climate agreement, with Russia earning a second place fossil for blocking important
text toward a new climate agreement, and Antigua and Barbuda taking first place for,
on the second day in a row, working to keep civil society's voices out of the
negotiations. On a more positive note, many nations spoke out against Saudi Arabia
and Qatar's efforts to find more ways to be paid for lost oil revenues as the world
moves toward cutting fossil fuels' contribution to climate change.

The Fossils as presented read:

"Russia earns the Second place Fossil. This morning, in the contact group on Shared
Vision and in the LCA plenary, Russia did not accept the Facilitator's note becoming
an INF document. By blocking this note from becoming an INF document, Russia
stopped the negotiations on Shared Vision from moving forward, whereas an
agreement on Shared Vision is a key element of a future legally binding instrument on
climate change."

"Today's First place Fossil award goes to Antigua and Barbuda for standing up, yet
again, against increased transparency and engagement of civil society.

In last night's SBI plenary, Antigua and Barbuda continued to raise concerns about a
number of suggested improvements to transparency. At one point, they even claimed
that because they once couldn't find a seat in a meeting room, they couldn't support
increased openness in this process. Perhaps they should listen to their colleagues in
AOSIS, many of whom stood up to show strong support for NGO participation in
their own statements. Should any delegates from Antigua and Barbuda have difficulty
finding somewhere to sit, any CAN member would gladly give up their seat and stand
in the room, so long as the doors are open.

For Antigua and Barbuda's very confusing and extremely disappointing stance against
transparency and civil society participation, we award them the First place Fossil."
"The Ray of the Day goes to Cook Islands, Tonga, EU, Australia, Norway, Suriname,
Switzerland, Colombia, Tuvalu, Mexico, St. Lucia, USA, Singapore, New Zealand,
Barbados, Bolivia, Japan, & The Gambia for jointly and strongly rejecting the
demand by Saudi Arabia, supported by Qatar, to have response measures included in
the SBI conclusions on loss and damage. As per the Bali Action Plan and the Cancún
agreements, response measures has its place under mitigation and should not be dealt
with when it comes to adaptation to the adverse effects of climate change."
_____________________________________________________________________
About CAN: The Climate Action Network is a worldwide network of roughly 500
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable
levels. www.climatenetwork.org
About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate
talks in 1999  in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations
climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action
Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress
in the negotiations in the last days of talks.
###

Russia & Antigua and Barbuda Earn Fossils, Many Nations Receive Joint Ray

       
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                  17 June 2011
Contact:
Kyle Gracey
kylegracey@gmail.com
+1 814 659 2405

Russia & Antigua and Barbuda Earn Fossils, Many Nations Receive Joint Ray
Bonn, Germany – On the last day of the United Nations climate negotiations,
countries continued to slow progress toward a fair, ambitious, and binding global
climate agreement, with Russia earning a second place fossil for blocking important
text toward a new climate agreement, and Antigua and Barbuda taking first place for,
on the second day in a row, working to keep civil society's voices out of the
negotiations. On a more positive note, many nations spoke out against Saudi Arabia
and Qatar's efforts to find more ways to be paid for lost oil revenues as the world
moves toward cutting fossil fuels' contribution to climate change.

The Fossils as presented read:

"Russia earns the Second place Fossil. This morning, in the contact group on Shared
Vision and in the LCA plenary, Russia did not accept the Facilitator's note becoming
an INF document. By blocking this note from becoming an INF document, Russia
stopped the negotiations on Shared Vision from moving forward, whereas an
agreement on Shared Vision is a key element of a future legally binding instrument on
climate change."

"Today's First place Fossil award goes to Antigua and Barbuda for standing up, yet
again, against increased transparency and engagement of civil society.

In last night's SBI plenary, Antigua and Barbuda continued to raise concerns about a
number of suggested improvements to transparency. At one point, they even claimed
that because they once couldn't find a seat in a meeting room, they couldn't support
increased openness in this process. Perhaps they should listen to their colleagues in
AOSIS, many of whom stood up to show strong support for NGO participation in
their own statements. Should any delegates from Antigua and Barbuda have difficulty
finding somewhere to sit, any CAN member would gladly give up their seat and stand
in the room, so long as the doors are open.For Antigua and Barbuda's very confusing and extremely disappointing stance against transparency and civil society participation, we award them the First place Fossil."

"The Ray of the Day goes to Cook Islands, Tonga, EU, Australia, Norway, Suriname,
Switzerland, Colombia, Tuvalu, Mexico, St. Lucia, USA, Singapore, New Zealand,
Barbados, Bolivia, Japan, & The Gambia
for jointly and strongly rejecting the
demand by Saudi Arabia, supported by Qatar, to have response measures included in
the SBI conclusions on loss and damage. As per the Bali Action Plan and the Cancún
agreements, response measures has its place under mitigation and should not be dealt
with when it comes to adaptation to the adverse effects of climate change."
_____________________________________________________________________
About CAN: The Climate Action Network is a worldwide network of roughly 500
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable
levels. www.climatenetwork.org
About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate
talks in 1999  in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations
climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action
Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress
in the negotiations in the last days of talks.
###

CAN Intervention - SBI Closing Plenary - 17 June, 2011

Thank you Chair,
My name is Sandra Guzman from the Mexican Centre of Environmental Law and I am speaking on behalf of the Climate Action Network.
 
We call on Parties to acknowledge the role of civil society, in the designing of the CDM appeals procedure. The CDM has often been criticized for its inability to reduce emissions and contribute to sustainable development. There lacks effective public participation, and meaningful public participation is a first step to address the wider impacts that flawed CDM projects have on global climate change.

On the other hand, while we heard very positive statements in last week's workshop on NGO engagement, we are disheartened that these words could not be turned into more robust action on this issue. It is extremely unfortunate that some parties seek to hide behind closed doors and turn away from more substantive and productive engagement with civil society. We are here to help, if only parties will allow us. We look forward to continuing discussions on proposals that could not be agreed to here at SBI's next session.

It is now and here where Parties can make the difference.
 
Thank you, Chair.

 

Region: 

A Slew of Fossils and Rays Awarded On Second to Last Day of Bonn Talks

16 June, 2011

A Slew of Fossils and Rays Awarded On Second to Last Day of Bonn Talks
Bonn, Germany – With just over a day left in the United Nations climate change
negotiations here, countries showed they still have plenty of energy left to delay
progress in the fight against climate change, while other nations showed they
recognized how important civil society is in moving the negotiations forward.
Frequent “winner” Saudi Arabia took another Fossil, joined this time by a surprise
blocker, Antigua and Barbuda, for trying to diminish civil society's role in the talks.
Meanwhile, four nations and the European Union earned a rare Ray of the Day for
supporting the very same civil society groups. Both were overshadowed by the fossil
for Japan's renewed refusal to extend its namesake Kyoto Protocol.

The Fossils as presented read:

"The Second place Fossil goes to Saudi Arabia and Antigua and Barbuda for blocking
attempts to enhance NGO participation. Saudi Arabia is a frequent winner of these
awards and really needs no explanation. They have a long history of blocking just
about everything from legal issues to adaptation, agendas to observer participation.
The Saudis should be isolated for their obstructionist ways and not allowed to dictate
text on this or any other issue. As for Antigua & Barbuda, it breaks our heart to give
your individual country the fossil, but to suggest that we would be moving too fast to
allow NGOs to make interventions without submitting written statements in advance
is just ridiculous! In the fight against climate change, speed is of the essence! For
prompting a lack of engagement and transparency, you two get the fossil!"

"Japan earns the First place Fossil. Yesterday, we heard again Japan’s well known
position that it will not inscribe a target under a second period of the Kyoto Protocol
under ANY circumstance. It is very regrettable that we see no room for flexibility.
The Kyoto Protocol second commitment period is the heart of a Durban package and
Japan’s unchanged position will jeopardize the success of the Durban meeting.
Market mechanisms, which Japan favors so much, may not be used anymore if Japan
doesn’t have a target under the Kyoto Protocol. Is this really OK, Japan? Lack of a
target under the international legal framework would weaken implementation of
domestic policies and actions and lose international competitiveness in a low carbon
economy. We don’t really understand."  

"The Ray of the Day goes to a group of countries who have stood strong for
transparency in the face of attacks from countries hoping to hide behind closed doors.
They clearly recognize the productive and important role NGOs play in this process
and have done all they can to suggest improvements, propose compromises, and shine
a light on this process in the hopes of supporting not only civil society but in so doing
also the global effort to address climate change. On a side note, if more Parties had
similar positions on transparency to these, perhaps we could avoid protracted fights
on agendas and other matters in the future, simply in order to avoid embarrassment.
For these actions in support of transparency, accountability and civil society, we
award this Ray of the Day to the EU, Mexico, Bolivia, Philippines, and Australia."
_____________________________________________________________________
About CAN: The Climate Action Network is a worldwide network of roughly 500
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable
levels. www.climatenetwork.org
About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate
talks in 1999  in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations
climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action
Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress
in the negotiations in the last days of talks.

###

Topics: 
Region: 

Pages

Subscribe to Tag: NGO participation