Tag: G7

CAN Briefing: G20 Key Demands, July 2016

In December 2015, the G20, as part of the 196 Parties to the UNFCCC, committed to a historic global agreement to address climate change and pursue efforts to limit the global temperature increase to 1.5°C above preindustrial levels, so as to mitigate the harmful effects on the world’s people, biodiversity and the global environment.

According to the IPCC, the global carbon budget consistent with a 66% chance of limiting the temperature rise to 1.5ºC will be used up by 2021 if we carry on under current projections. For any fair likelihood of meeting the Paris temperature targets, our collective mitigation efforts need to be multiplied as soon as possible. Otherwise, our countries and economies will face severe impacts of unstoppable climate change, including social, environmental and economic instability. In recent years, we have seen the G20 countries take more serious notice of the role that climate change plays on its overall objectives, in particular its objective to promote financial stability. G20 leadership on climate change is extremely important since the greenhouse gas emissions of the G20 member countries account for approximately 81% of total global emissions. It is therefore imperative that the G20 countries start collaborating immediately on the implementation of the Paris Agreement, using their influence, to develop a consensus-building approach and focus on financial stability to drive stronger action on climate change.

Climate Action Network has eight key demands for the G20:

  • Ratify the Paris Agreement as soon as possible; 
  • Develop and communicate interim National Long-term Strategies for Sustainable Development and Decarbonization by 2018; 
  • Achieve an ambitious outcome on HFC phase-down this year;
  • Introduce mandatory climate-risk disclosure for investments; 
  • Remove fossil-fuel subsidies;
  • Accelerate renewable energy initiatives towards 100% RE; 
  • Ensure that new infrastructure is pro-poor and climate compatible;
  • Support effective ambition for international aviation and shipping.
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International Media Briefing: Half way on the Road to Paris - where are we and where do we need to be

We are now almost half way through 2015, and climate change politics is heating up.  Ministers and Heads of State are meeting in various fora - from the G7 to the Petersberg Dialogue - to discuss the shape of the Paris agreement, countries are putting forward their national plans outlining how they'll move their economies away from fossil fuels, and people from all walks of life are preparing to take to the streets to show their support for scaling up climate action.  

Ahead of the UN climate negotiations getting underway on June 1, Climate Action Network experts will brief reporters on the state of play in international climate politics and what that means for the Bonn talks.

WhenThursday May 28th, 9am London  - 10am Berlin - 11am Addis Ababa - 1.30pm New Delhi - 4pm Beijing - 8pm Sydney.  You can check your timezone here. (In the Americas? Join the sister call by contacting PKnappenberger@climatenexus.org )

CAN members have also commented today on the outcome of the Petersberg Dialogue: read more here or see the Climate Chancellor in action here

Who: 

- Liz Gallagher, E3G
- Pierre Cannet, WWF France
- Li Shuo, Greenpeace China 

To Join:

You can join the teleconference online: here: www.uberconference.com/climateactionnetwork or dial the relevant telephone number for your country listed below and enter the conference number855-534-4477 followed by the # key when requested.

From the US or via Skype, dial (+1) 855-534-4477 - no PIN required. 
A full list of available telephone numbers can be found here: https://www.uberconference.com/international 

If your country is not listed, and you cannot join via internet browser, please contact us. 

Contact:
Ria Voorhaar, CAN International, email: rvoorhaar@climatenetwork.org, phone: +49 157 3173 5568

About CAN:
Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 900 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. More at: www.climatenetwork.org

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Petersberg Dialogue reaffirms goal to phase out fossil fuel emissions, all eyes now on Merkel at the G7

Environment ministers from 35 countries met together with German Chancellor Angel Merkel and French President François Hollande as part of the Petersberg Climate Dialogue in Berlin today. The politicians discussed key points of the new, universal global climate agreement to be signed later this year in Paris. 
 
Today's meeting part of a series of high level meetings happening six months out from the Paris talks. These include the Business and Climate Summit happening in Paris this week and the G7 in Germany in June, at which many leading corporations and major economies respectively are expected to back a long term goal to phase out fossil fuel emissions as part of the Paris agreement. 
 
As anticipated, national climate plans (or Intended Nationally Determined Contributions) so far submitted by countries such as Canada, the EU, the US and others move us closer to, but not all the way to, a safe climate. We therefore need the G7 to support a Paris agreement that scales up action over time. A key tool that Paris can offer is a long term goal to phase out emissions and phase in renewable energy in conjunction with national plans that scale up over time to meet that goal. Achieving a that goal will require the leadership of both Merkel and Hollande. 
 
On the release of the Petersberg Dialogue statement, Climate Action Network members had the following comments:
 

Christoph Schott, Senior Campaigner at Avaaz in Germany, said:

The world needs climate superheroes, and the G7 could be Angela Merkel's moment to dust off her green cape and rise to the biggest challenge humankind has ever faced. The climate chancellor has been missing in action recently, but this summer she can inspire the world with 100% clean energy by 2050, something 2.3 million people want to see.

 
Martin Kaiser, head of international climate politics with Greenpeace, said:
 

German Chancellor Angela Merkel sent an important signal today when she reaffirmed the long term goal of global decarbonisation - a necessary first step for a global energy transition towards 100% renewable energy for all. However, this goal can and must be reached by 2050.  We must not delay it until the end of the century. We expect Merkel to now engage in the heated debate underway in Germany  by jump-starting a fair phase-out of coal in the country. Is she up to the task? The G7 Summit will be the defining last moment for Merkel to either establish herself as the 'coal chancellor' or the 'climate chancellor'.

 

Celia Gautier, EU policy advisor with RAC France, said:
 
For France to take the lead and secure an ambitious and durable agreement, it is crucial François Hollande step up climate action in France. France's energy transition is not fully under way. The country isn't even on track to meet its 2020 renewable energy target and French utilities are still massively investing in coal power plants abroad. This is not setting an example for the rest of the world. It's undermining France's capacity to stabilize climate change below 2°C. President Hollande has two hundred days left to clean up his act.
 
 
Contact:
Ria Voorhaar
Head - International Communications Coordination 
Climate Action Network – International (CAN)
 
mobile: +49 157 3173 5568
skype: ria.voorhaar
 

CAN Letter to Chancellor Merkel and the G7 re: April Meetings, April 9, 2015

Dear Madam Chancellor,

2015 will be a decisive year for setting the course for climate policy. Germany is addressing the implementation of its Climate Action Program 2020 and the design of the power market while the EU is discussing how to put its emissions trading system on track again. At the international level a new global climate agreement is to be concluded at COP 21 in Paris in December. In view of this we very much welcome that “climate action” has been chosen as a key topic for the G7 agenda. Climate Action Network International, the broadest civil society coalition aiming at overcoming the climate crisis, kindly asks you to consider the following proposals for your G7 presidency.

Many countries have already started transformational processes at the national level, including increasingly basing their economic development on renewables and improved energy efficiency instead of fossil energy sources. Since renewable energies have undergone significant price declines in recent years, they have become competitive in many regions of the world thereby creating new development opportunities and expanding access to energy. These developments have to be strengthened and expanded by providing favorable political framework conditions.

In this context, the international climate negotiations play an important role. Decisions made within the context of the UNFCCC attract worldwide attention. They provide long term orientation and can give clear signals to investors that low carbon development is not only inevitable but also a real economic opportunity. During your last G8 presidency you were instrumental in defining the “2°C limit”. This has been a groundbreaking first step. We call on you to consolidate the achievements of the past during your current G7 presidency:

  1. Based on the L’Aquila declaration from 2009, and taking into account the G7’s particular responsibility, the G7 should make the next step and commit to a more specific and actionable long-term goal. In accordance with the high probability scenario of IPCC to limit global warming to two degrees Celsius or even 1.5 degrees Celsius it is necessary to phase out fossil fuel use and to phase in 100% renewable energies by 2050, providing sustainable energy access for all people.
  2. This long-term goal should be backed up with a substantial increase in efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, both in the run up to 2020 as in the post-2020 period for which countries are currently making pledges that seem insufficient to avoid dangerous climate change. For example, G7 countries should commit to deadlines for phasing-out domestic use of coal. 
  3. The G7 should confirm its commitment to the goal of mobilizing $ 100 billion in climate finance by 2020, as enshrined in the Copenhagen Accord. This should be backed with a corresponding pathway including increasing annual public contributions until 2020.
  4. G7 should commit to a global goal of ensuring climate resilience to all people by developing, implementing and financing developing country National Climate Adaptation Plans and respective robust and effective national and international frameworks to reduce and manage climate risks and losses that go beyond adaptation capacities. We welcome that Germany plans to enhance the G7 commitment to strengthen climate risk management in vulnerable developing countries. We ask you to ensure a strong focus on the needs of particularly vulnerable people and communities, espeically women. 

However, in CAN’s opinion, initiatives taken by G7 states should not only be limited to the UNFCCC process. While the above steps could in particular support progress in the UNFCCC process, the G7 should take complementary initiatives aiming at fostering trust building between developed and developing countries by launching projects and initiatives to facilitate the transformation process towards a low carbon and climate resilient future. Therefore, we call for your support to:

  1. Terminate the international financing of coal and lignite fired power plants including related infrastructure through the G7's development banks, other public banks and export credit agencies.
  2. Initiate new or significantly strengthen existing initiatives and financing instruments to promote capacity building, technology transfer and investments in renewable energies and energy efficiency in developing countries with ambitious climate and energy strategies.
  3. Mobilize new and innovative sources of climate finance including a Financial Transaction Tax (FTT).
  4. Accelerate efforts to end subsidies for fossil fuels by 2015 in the G7 countries, which have all signed the respective G20 agreement in 2009.

​Madame Chancellor, we are looking forward to further exchange views on these issues and remain at your disposal.

Kind regards, 

Wael Hmaidan

 

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