Tag: G20

G20 Issue Brief: Long-term Strategies, February 2017

The Paris Agreement calls for countries to formulate long-term low-GHG emission development strategies, in line with pursuing efforts to limiting global temperature increase to 1.5ºC. With the 2016 adoption of Agenda 2030, countries are also beginning to implement policies to fulfil the sustainable development goals (SDGs).

Long-term strategies create a framework within which the implications of short-to-medium-term decisions that impact both greenhouse gas emission trajectories and development pathways can be coherently planned and adjusted where necessary. Developing and implementing these strategies ensures alignment with the long-term goals of the Paris Agreement, in a way that fosters increased prosperity for citizens, reduces the risk of locking-in unsustainable and high-emission infrastructure, and will help to avoid stranded high-carbon assets.

Careful long-term planning also provides an opportunity to maximize socio-economic benefits, such as cleaner air and water, improved security for jobs and energy access, and better health. If well done, these strategies can identify such opportunities, as well as challenges, open a space for democratic consultation on these implications, and secure a just transition for workers and communities which depend today on a fossil-based economy. 

Region: 
Organization: 

Letter to G7 Sherpas: Make climate change a priority

"The G7 has played a pivotal role in shaping multilateral diplomacy and international climate policy and in upholding the principles of sustainable growth and development. We need this leadership now more than ever.All G7 countries have ratified the Paris Agreement and must deliver on commitments to limit the increase in global temperature well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C. The credibility of the implementation of the Paris Agreement rests on countries honoring commitments on climate finance and demonstrating the will to undertake a global low-carbon transition as agreed at COP22 in Marrakesh."

 

To                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            25 April 2017

The Sherpas of the G7, under the Italian Presidency

Re: The 3rd G7 Sherpa’s meeting on 26-27 April

Dear Ambassadors,

Climate Action Network, a broad coalition of 1200 civil society organisations in over 120 countries fighting climate change, calls on the G7 to put climate change at the front and centre of discussions in the upcoming Sherpa’s meeting and in the G7 Heads of State meeting on 26-27 May.  

The G7 has played a pivotal role in shaping multilateral diplomacy and international climate policy and in upholding the principles of sustainable growth and development. We need this leadership now more than ever.All G7 countries have ratified the Paris Agreement and must deliver on commitments to limit the increase in global temperature well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C. The credibility of the implementation of the Paris Agreement rests on countries honoring commitments on climate finance and demonstrating the will to undertake a global low-carbon transition as agreed at COP22 in Marrakesh.

The recent G7 energy ministers’ discussions failed to live up to expectations and demonstrate the urgency that is required to tackle the pace and scale of climate change that confronts us. This cannot set a precedent for discussions in future meetings.
We, however, do appreciate that most of the countries stood firm on implementing the Paris Agreement and the need for a decarbonisation strategy.
Future meetings of G7 countries must significantly advance discussions on the global climate agenda if we want to maintain trust in the multilateral system.

The United States’ decision to retreat from domestic and international climate action cannot stand in the way of other countries leading the charge towards decarbonisation and ramping up national targets to cut emissions commensurate with their promises in Paris. At this juncture, the G7 cannot afford to dither on its commitments or be undermined by any one country. There is no room for a compromise that results in diluting language on climate change, climate finance and decarbonisation to a mere footnote. This would be a failure.
Countries must stand firmly together to prevent backsliding on hard-won global consensus on climate action, even going as far to issue a climate declaration in the name of the G6 should one country obstruct the way forward.   

Sincerely,
Wael Hmaidan
Director, Climate Action Network-International

Tags: 
Topics: 

G20 Issue Brief: Sustainable Infrastructure, February 2017

The additional up-front investment required for a sustainable infrastructure pathway by 2030 is estimated at less than 5% above baseline levels, and is very likely to be more than “offset” by the resulting energy and fuel savings from modern clean energy and energy efficiency, with large additional benefits resulting from avoided climate impacts and air pollution related health costs, as well as reduced risk of stranded assets. Present externalities of and subsidies to burning fossil fuels amount to a staggering 6.5% of global GDP.

Topics: 
Region: 
Organization: 

G20 Issue Brief: Phasing Out Fossil Fuel Subsidies, February 2017

It is estimated that fossil fuel subsidies contributed up to 36% of global emissions between 1980 and 2010, while also exacerbating health problems, air and water local pollution. Limiting their use is a key step towards reducing inequality and achieving inclusive growth, since fossil fuel subsidies disproportionately benefit the middle and upper classes. Fossil fuel subsidies constitute an inefficient use of scarce public funds, and inhibit the market penetration of price-competitive renewables. While subsidies more broadly can be used as an effective tool to support the poor and promote a particular industry for the benefit of larger good, an industry that is well-established should not be the beneficiary of limited public resources, especially when cost-effective and healthier alternatives are available.

Region: 
Organization: 

G20 Issue Brief: Ratification of the Montreal Protocol Amendment on HFCs, February 2017

In the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol adopted in 2016, parties agreed to phase-down hydrofluorocarbons, the fastest growing climate pollutants. Once implemented, this phase-down could prevent emissions of 80 GtCO2e by 2050, reducing global warming by up to 0.5ºC by the end of the century compared to business as usual.

In addition, the HFC phasedown under the Montreal Protocol will, as has always been the case in the past, provide the opportunity to improve energy efficiency in air conditioning and refrigeration systems, potentially in the range of 30 to 60%. In the room air conditioning sector alone, improving energy efficiency of equipment by 30% while simultaneously transitioning to low-GWP alternatives could save an amount of electricity equivalent to up to 2,500 medium-sized power plants globally by 2050, while providing climate mitigation of nearly 100 Gt CO2-eq by 2050 from this sector.

Region: 
Organization: 

G20 Issue Brief: Sustainable Finance, February 2017

 

 

Delivering the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030 requires some $90trn of investments over the next 15 years. The issue is not availability of capital: our global financial system today is nearly $300trn strong and growing. Rather, the challenge is aligning financial regulation with sustainability objectives to shift financial flows and unleash green finance. Success would result in more than just meeting SDGs. It would create a more resilient, sustainable and inclusive global economy, while at the same time adding approximately $12trn a year to global GDP – and possibly more. In their current form, however, financial markets do not price in the externalities of investments at a level strong enough to shift investments decisions; nor do they provide enough public information to market players regarding their exposure to sustainability-related risks and opportunities. More work is also needed to scale up green finance.

Topics: 
Region: 
Organization: 

German G20 must mobilise action on climate change for a stronger and safer world

Germany today took over the G20 Presidency by outlining its mission for 2017 under the overarching motto of “Shaping an Interconnected World”

1 December 2016:  Climate Action Network calls on the German Presidency to use the G20 platform to mobilise international cooperation and action on climate change. 
Decisive action on climate change is vital to strengthening global stability and achieving sustainable development, two pillars of the 2017 G20 agenda. The G20 countries account for nearly 80 percent of global emissions. They have a responsibility to lead on several actions to ensure that climate change does not further endanger global stability.  

By making climate-risk disclosure mandatory, the G20 can ensure that new investment in infrastructure is climate-resilient and low carbon. This is vital to avoid the serious risk of stranded assets that threaten financial stability and economic growth. 

Inefficient fossil fuel subsidies skew markets in favour of energy sources that are not environmentally sustainable and which fail to deliver long-term energy security. 
G20 governments must unlock the potential of renewable energy sources that are now cost-competitive in many parts of the world. They must further commit to halt fossil-fuel based development and infrastructure investments. Green finance will be an essential enabling element in the necessary global energy transition to 100% renewable energy.

Developing mid-century strategies for sustainable development and decarbonization is a key step in ensuring stable and resilient national economies. Such long-term planning will send clear signals to the private sector, and help build a framework for investments in line with development goals and those of the Paris Agreement.

Mitigating and adapting to climate change will be key to global security as the scale and frequency of extreme weather events threaten vulnerable communities and exacerbate scarcity of natural resources. 
In 2015, all G20 governments adopted the Paris Agreement and Agenda 2030-the Sustainable Development Goals. During COP 22 in Marrakech last month, 48 of the most vulnerable countries committed to transitioning to 100% renewable energy by 2050. 
Now the world’s largest economies must ensure that their economic decisions are compatible with the commitments they made in Paris and in line with the direction in which the global economy is moving.

Germany, at the helm of the G20 must reaffirm commitments to avoid irreversible climate change. It must through its G20 leadership, work to ensure a progressive outcome on global climate action.    

CAN members comment on the start of the German G20 Presidency  

“Climate science tells us that the responsible thing to do is to stop building new fossil fuel infrastructure now. Germany should push the G20 in this direction, and at the very least, should advance the 2009 G20 promise to end fossil fuel subsidies. We can’t afford to build new fossil fuel infrastructure, and we certainly can’t afford to waste even one more cent of public money on it.” Alex Doukas, Senior Campaigner, Oil Change International

“As the G20 Presidency enters Europe for the next 12 months, Germany and the whole European Union should get behind an ambitious work plan that moves the world's largest economies further away from fossil fuels and closer towards being fully renewables based and energy efficient. Germany together with the rest of the EU now have the opportunity to solidify their alleged climate leadership. This includes phasing out fossil fuel subsidies, increasing near-term climate action and getting down to business with the EU's long-term decarbonisation strategy.” Wendel Trio, Director, Climate Action Network Europe

“As the world’s largest emitters and strongest economies, the G20 have a responsibility to act on climate change. The Paris Agreement has set a globally agreed framework for responding to the climate crisis, but we can only achieve the Paris objectives if the G20 now acts decisively on implementation. We welcome the emphasis the German presidency has announced to put on this issue. We expect chancellor Merkel to make it very clear that climate change has to be a priority, also vis-a-vis the incoming U.S. administration. All G20 countries need to agree to develop their mid-century decarbonization plans by 2018.” Christoph Bals, Policy Director, Germanwatch     

For more information, contact Dharini Parthasarathy, Communications Coordinator, Policy, CAN- International; email: dparthasarathy@climatenetwork.org, or call on +32468405277

About Climate Action Network:
Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 1200 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. www.climatenetwork.org

Tags: 
Topics: 

CAN Briefing: G20 Key Demands, July 2016

In December 2015, the G20, as part of the 196 Parties to the UNFCCC, committed to a historic global agreement to address climate change and pursue efforts to limit the global temperature increase to 1.5°C above preindustrial levels, so as to mitigate the harmful effects on the world’s people, biodiversity and the global environment.

According to the IPCC, the global carbon budget consistent with a 66% chance of limiting the temperature rise to 1.5ºC will be used up by 2021 if we carry on under current projections. For any fair likelihood of meeting the Paris temperature targets, our collective mitigation efforts need to be multiplied as soon as possible. Otherwise, our countries and economies will face severe impacts of unstoppable climate change, including social, environmental and economic instability. In recent years, we have seen the G20 countries take more serious notice of the role that climate change plays on its overall objectives, in particular its objective to promote financial stability. G20 leadership on climate change is extremely important since the greenhouse gas emissions of the G20 member countries account for approximately 81% of total global emissions. It is therefore imperative that the G20 countries start collaborating immediately on the implementation of the Paris Agreement, using their influence, to develop a consensus-building approach and focus on financial stability to drive stronger action on climate change.

Climate Action Network has eight key demands for the G20:

  • Ratify the Paris Agreement as soon as possible; 
  • Develop and communicate interim National Long-term Strategies for Sustainable Development and Decarbonization by 2018; 
  • Achieve an ambitious outcome on HFC phase-down this year;
  • Introduce mandatory climate-risk disclosure for investments; 
  • Remove fossil-fuel subsidies;
  • Accelerate renewable energy initiatives towards 100% RE; 
  • Ensure that new infrastructure is pro-poor and climate compatible;
  • Support effective ambition for international aviation and shipping.
Region: 
Organization: 

CAN Briefing Paper: G20 Recommendations, November 2015

Held only two weeks before the UNFCCC COP21, the G20 Summit presents a unique opportunity to strengthen international confidence and momentum towards an ambitious climate agreement in Paris and to show commitment to low-emission and climate-resilient development by the biggest economies in the world.

Climate Action Network identified three key issues G20 countries need to assume a leadership role to send strong signals to Paris:

- Climate Finance
- Adaptation and Loss & Damage
- Emission reduction and economic transformation

NGO Experts to Brief Media on Major Climate Change Milestones of 2013 ahead of Next Round of Climate Negotiations

April 22, 2013 – NGO experts from the two largest climate change networks will brief media on April 25 at 13.30GMT on the current state of play in the international climate negotiations ahead of the year's first round of UN talks.  They will also preview major milestones in 2013 related to climate change, and their potential impact on the negotiations.   

 
Experts will address the recently announced bilateral cooperation planned between the U.S. and China, as well as the U.S. and Japan.  They will also address the role of the Major Economies Forum and the potential impact of the first release of an IPCC assessment report in more than five years.  Lastly, experts will also address recent climate change related developments in Europe and the role of Poland within the EU, given the government will host the climate talks in December of this year.  
 
What: NGO experts survey the political landscape ahead of the 2013 climate negotiations.   
 
When:  13.30GMT, Thursday, April 25, 2013
  • 9.30 in New York, Washington DC 
  • 14.30 in London
  • 15.30 in Amsterdam, Brussels, Paris, Berlin
 
Who:  
  • Alden Meyer, Union of Concerned Scientists, United States,  
  • Lina Li, Greenovation Hub, China  
  • Julia Michalak, Climate Action Network Europe. 
 
To join the teleconference, please dial the relevant toll-free telephone number for your country listed below and enter the Conference Room Number: 1231732 when requested.
 
 
Belgium: +32 (0) 80081379
Brazil: +55 (0) 8000474900
Canada: +1 (888) 299-3346
China: +86 4008811076
Germany: +49 08007235118
Japan: +81 (0) 120216700
U.A.E: +971 80004449671
United Kingdom: +44 (0) 8000284051
United States: +1 (866) 951-1151
 
If your country is not listed, please email rvoorhaar@climatenetwork.org to you will receive a local toll free number. 
 
 
About CAN and GCCA
Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 800 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels.
 
The Global Call for Climate Action is an international network of diverse non-profit organizations working to mobilize civil society and galvanize public opinion in support of climate action. Our partners, 400 and growing, come from a broad spectrum of civil society, including national and international NGO's working to protect the environment and to fight poverty.
 
Organization: 

Pages

Subscribe to Tag: G20