Tag: COP16

CAN Submission: Cancun Building Blocks, October 2010

THE POST-COPENHAGEN ROAD

A fair, ambitious and binding deal is needed more urgently than ever. Climate science is more compelling by the day. Impacts are coming harder and faster. Disastrous flooding in Pakistan, heat waves and forest fires in Russia and hottest recorded temperatures around the globe, amongst other devastating climate-related events, all point to the need for urgent action. Levels of warming once thought to be safe, may well not be, 1.5˚C is the new 2˚C. 

Negotiations Post-Copenhagen
Copenhagen was a watershed moment for public interest and support for climate action – and people have not lost interest. More people in more countries than ever have put their governments on notice that they expect a fair,
ambitious and binding global deal to be agreed urgently. Trust-building is essential after the disappointment of Copenhagen. Developed country leadership must be at the core of trust building efforts. Countries must show
their commitment to the UNFCCC process by driving it forward with political will and flexible positions, rather than endless rounds of repetitive negotiations. Many countries are troublingly pessimistic for Cancun, and are working to lower expectations. While others, including countries most vulnerable to climate change, maintain high expectations.

Challenges ahead of Cancun
There are many challenges to getting a full fair, ambitious and binding deal at Cancun, including:

  • Lack of a shared vision for the ultimate objective of the agreement, and the equitable allocation of the remaining carbon budget and emissions reduction/limitation commitments;
  • Sharp divisions on the legal form of an eventual outcome;
  • Failure of the US Senate to pass comprehensive legislation this year; and
  • Current economic difficulties facing many countries, which make it difficult to mobilize the substantial commitments to long-term climate finance needed as part of any ambitious agreement. 

Positive moves afoot
However, more and more countries, both developing and developed, are stepping up their efforts to pursue low-carbon development and adaptation, despite the absence of an international agreement. This can be seen in a variety of ways:

  • Investments in renewable energies have continued their exponential growth, increasing to 19% of global energy consumed;
  • Progressive countries are working to move the negotiations forward;
  • There is a growing perception that low-carbon and climate-resilient development is the only option to sustainably ensure the right to development and progress in poverty reduction. 

So, what does a pathway forward look like?

Firstly we must learn the lessons of Copenhagen. The “nothing’s agreed until everything’s agreed” dynamic from Copenhagen could mean that nothing would be agreed in Cancun. An agreement in Cancun should instead be a balanced and significant step toward reaching a full fair, ambitious & binding deal at COP 17 in South Africa. This will require parties to work together in good faith to create sufficient gains at Cancun, and a clear roadmap to South Africa. This paper outlines how that could be achieved. 

Manjeet Dhakal on the Technology Mechanism

Manjeet Dhakal on the Technology Mechanism

In the Cancun UN Climate Talks (COP16) it was decided that the Technology Mechanism will be fully operational in 2012. The institutions within the Technology Mechanism: Technology Executive Committee (TEC) and Climate Technology Centers and Network (CTCN) should be fully functioning to implement the Cancun Agreements. This is the reason CTCN has become an important issue of discussion here in Panamá.

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Negotiating (iphone) Technology On The Way To Durban

Manjeet Dhakal on the Technology Mechanism

Manjeet Dhakal
Clean Energy Nepal
Program Director
Nepal

 

One of my hobbies that I love is to use new and recently developed applications and technologies. On my last birthday, I was blessed with an 'iphone' from my colleague. I was very excited that day; I threw party on the same night when I got my iphone via DHL. Also credit goes to DHL for its service up to my far-flung apartment. And also I am grateful to my friend, that's the nicest thing that anyone's ever done for me. Otherwise, I would have never got chance to use such a wonderful thing, which would have cost almost six months of my personnel expenses in Nepal. As I remember now, I don’t know how that 'full iphone-week' passed; it felt like I was flying-up above Himalayas most of the time. My excitement continued when by the weekend, when my younger sister, studying civil engineering, asked me to find a map of our town on my iphone for her project work. Another hit was when my laureate brother asked me to find the meaning of some familiar Nepalese words, however, either my iphone does not support my language or not I could type on it. The next day I went to a local mobile service center on my town and discussed my problem with them. They tried all the possible solutions they could think of: they connected it with other devices, they installed and uninstalled software, but all of their efforts ruined root and branch.

Now, while having discussions with the friendly delegates here in Panamá, I realize that the Technology Executive Committee (TEC) has become like my friend (who gave me the iphone) and Climate Technology Centers and Network (CTCN) is like the service center in my town. Sometimes when the technology discussion is about service delivery, these institutions also seem like DHL, who did the hard job of delivering my iphone up to my apartment.

On the other side, the Technology Mechanism at Cancun was established to set-up institutions, which will help to protect the vulnerable from climate change and to deploy the money and technologies that developing countries need to plan and build their own sustainable futures. The Technology Executive Committee is foreseen as the policy arm and the Climate Technology Centre and Network as the mechanism’s implementation component. Its overarching goal was to sharpen the focus, step-up the pace, and expand the scope of environmentally-sound technology development and transfer to developing countries in a highly qualitative way.

Whereas, here, in Panama when the parties are tossing about the criteria and host of Climate Technology Center, we should request DHL to apply for it. The service delivery is well appreciated and it has outreached to all parts of world. And the important thing is that it will not charge a flat 10% of it service like some of our home institutions (banks and other sisters of the UNFCCC). Oh, but it may not have a good understanding about what adaptation is and where as it has greatly contributed to mitigating the cause of climate change.   

Then I realize, it's of no use to use those technologies which do not have local applications and applications that are not of your use. Take the example of my iphone; the company has filed more than 200 patent applications related to the technology, which seems to be preventing the over-reach of its own technology. Actually such right should have to retain a public balance in property rights and support its promotion. As decided in Cancun in order to make the Technology Mechanism fully operational in 2012, criteria and host of the Climate Technology Center and Network (CTCN) need to be finalized here at Panamá or very soon, so that, after Durban, we can focus on activities related to implementation, and more specifically deployment and diffusion of environmentally sound technologies.    
 

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Japan Takes 1st Place Fossil of the Day for KP Attack, U.S. Scores 2nd and 3rd

8 December 2010

Cancun, Mexico – Japan earned a 1st place Fossil for its continued efforts to kill the
Kyoto Protocol by preventing a second commitment period from moving forward.
The United States, fresh off its first, and 1st place, Fossil in Cancun yesterday, earned
its first 2nd and 3rd place Fossils for slowing technology transfer and developing
country adaptation support.

The Fossils as presented read:
"The United States wins the 3rd place Fossil. Congratulations US - Technology
transfer has been a core commitment since the beginning of the Convention, and
we’ve already wasted too much time discussing how to do it. A workable proposal is
finally on the table and everyone else is willing to go with it and establish the new
technology mechanism here in Cancun. But yesterday, you made it clear that in your
view, the Parties should only ‘consider’ establishing it.

That’s strange, given that the Copenhagen Accord clearly states that leaders agreed to
‘establish a Technology Mechanism’, ‘operational immediately’. We are surprised
you are going back behind what heads of state already agreed to and try to renegotiate
a deal struck a deal struck among world leaders. For the last year, most parties in the
technology negotiations have been working hard to answer the remaining questions
and a lot of progress was made in Cancun. While everyone else is being flexible, your
obstructionism is blocking any progress.

The US championed the need for a technology center and network and you are
developing some regional center pilots, so why the heartburn on the proposal on the
table? Concerns by US clean tech companies about being under a burdensome and
bureaucratic UN body are misinformed; what our warming world needs is precisely
what a multilateral mechanism can deliver: coordinated planning and implementation
to speed-up and scale-up the what poor countries and communities need to transition
quickly to a low-emissions future."

"The USA wins the 2nd place Fossil for delaying agreement on the establishment of
an Adaptation Committee, which is demanded by developing countries to improve
coherence and coordination of adaptation under the Convention. The US continues to
insist on clarification of the functions and asked in Cancun whether this could not be
dealt with under SBSTA, an approach which they had rejected some years ago when
it was on the SBSTA agenda. The Convention process requires a dedicated
institutional arrangement on adaptation which can initiate further action, not limited to
technical advice. This function cannot be fulfilled by existing institutions outside the
Convention."

"The 1st place Fossil goes to Japan. Although the Minister arrived on Sunday, Japan
has not yet changed its position of rejecting to put its target for the second
commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol, which virtually kills the future of the
Kyoto Protocol. Despite the plea from all around the world, even in the midst of the
isolation (with hidden allies consisting of Russia and Canada), Japan's inflexibility
endangers the whole discussion of the future framework at CANCUN, which the earth
desperately needs."

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About CAN: The Climate Action Network is a worldwide network of roughly 500
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable
levels. www.climatenetwork.org


About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate
talks in 1999  in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations
climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action
Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress
in the negotiations in the last days of talks.

 

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Packed Fossil Ceremony Features 3 Fossils, Colossal Fossil, Ray of the Day

Final Fossil of the Day - Day 10 - Cancun, Mexico COP16 (Dec 10th)

Cancun, Mexico – The United States took another 1st place Fossil on the last regular
night of Fossil of the Day awards in these United Nations negotiations, but with
strong competition from several other countries, and the overall worst country award,
the Colossal Fossil, going to its neighbor to the north, Canada, renamed “Can’t”nada
for the night. The United States held major pieces of the negotiations hostage waiting
for developing countries to agree to verify their pollution reductions, Russia further
endangered the Kyoto Protocol’s Second Commitment Period, and Venezuela and
Saudi Arabia teamed up to block a report on innovative sources of climate financing.

Mexico’s performance shone much brighter, exhibiting transparency and fortitude in
moving the negotiations forward, earning it a Ray of the Day in the first major climate
negotiations taking place in its own country, and scoring only the second, and likely
final, Ray of these negotiations.

The Fossils and Ray of the Day, as presented, read:
"Venezuela and Saudi Arabia receive the 3rd place Fossil for blocking a report on
innovative sources of financing for climate action, in the finance group of the LCA.
The report of the Secretary General’s Advisory Group on Climate Change Finance
(AGF Report) is a treasure trove of ideas and analyses of innovative sources of public
financing that can support developing countries with urgently needed adaptation and
emissions reductions actions. Perhaps Venezuela and the Saudis don’t realize that
there are developing countries elsewhere in the world that can’t count on oil exports
to pay for their luxuries and meet the needs of their people.
 

The report may not be perfect, but if parties start from scratch next year looking at
financing sources without input from this report, they may have to reinvent the wheel
and it could hold delay progress for years, if these same countries use all the tricks at
their disposal to disrupt progress."

"Russia earns the 2nd place Fossil. Oh, what a miserable year to be Russia. From
severe heat to dust storms raising awareness of climate impacts, it was a tough year
for anyone wanting to avoid cutting their greenhouse gas pollution. But, you managed
to pull it off, endangering the Kyoto Protocol by failing to inscribe your pledges under
the KP text. For that, you get a 2nd place Fossil and our continued shame."
"The United States of America earns the 1st place Fossil. The Fossil goes to the US
for blocking important text to ensure effective accounting measures for developed
country emissions targets. The US has held hostage all the other building blocks to an
agreement in MRV/ICA. Its refusal to accept good accounting measures for its own
(highly inadequate) actions is ironic and hypocritical."

"Canada wins the Colossal Fossil for the year. In Fossil terms, today’s winning
country is building a dynasty. Day in and day out, it gives 110% in the battle for fossil
supremacy. It blocks, avoids, delays, and fakes -- and its emissions simply never stop
growing. Its tar sands sector is truly among the global elite, an all-star of greenhouse
gas pollution. Please welcome the New York Yankees of Fossils (or as we say in
Canada, the Montreal Canadians): 2010’s Colossal Fossil is the country we’ve come
to know as “Can’t”nada. This is Canada’s fourth Fossil victory in as many years. So
despite an overall record of climate futility, Canadians should rest assured  there’s at least one thing here that Canada is really, really good at."

"Mexico earns a Ray of the Day. As we saw in Copenhagen, transparency is not a
given in the UNFCCC process, although it’s supposed to be. Nor is intransigence a
requirement, although we see it much too often.
 

The role of a successful host country is to avoid these pitfalls and push Parties toward
a good and mutually agreed outcome, not just to save face, but to truly advance the
process. Mexico showed this and more, deeply involving itself in leadership of the
negotiations and demonstrating fortitude in the face of countries many thought could
never agree. For good process and transparency, strength, and perseverance, your
leadership earns you only the second Ray of the Day awarded in your home city."
_____________________________________________________________________
About CAN: The Climate Action Network is a worldwide network of roughly 500
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable
levels. www.climatenetwork.org

About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate
talks in 1999  in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations
climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action
Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress
in the negotiations in the last days of talks. The Ray of the Day, a newer award,
honors countries that have done something exceptional to move the negotiations
forward.

 

 

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Daryl Hannah Presents First Ray of the Day and 3 Fossils Awarded Too - Canada Takes 1st Place... Yet Again

Cancun, Mexico – Canada once again took the 1 place Fossil of the Day today at the United Nations climate negotiations, this time for calling the idea that the biggest polluters should take on the biggest pollution reductions a “side car” issue. This is Canada’s sixth Fossil in Cancun. Papua New Guinea won its first Fossil, coming in 2nd place, for watering down environmental and social safeguards in a potential REDD forest protection agreement. The United States earned a Fossil for the third day in a row, this time for blocking progress on a host of issues unless developing countries
took on more commitments.

On a positive note, a large bloc of the countries most harmed by climate change impacts, especially sea level rise, earned the firs Ray of the Day at the Cancun negotiations for putting the reference to the safe upper limit to temperature rise, 1.5° Celsius, back in the negotiating text.

The Fossils and Ray of the Day, as presented, read:

“The United States of America wins the 3rd place Fossil. UK weather forecasts warn that Christmas could be canceled due to a once-in-a-lifetime cold front coming from the North, but it seems a similar cold front has already arrived from Washington. US officials indicated today that they won’t allow movement on adaptation, capacity building or technology until developing countries move more on MRV and Mitigation to keep them happy. Throwing up such roadblocks to progress is at odds with what Ambassador Stern said himself, 'Let's not do nothing...Let's not be hung up for year after year after year.'

Yet nothing but blocking and blaming appears to be all that the world may get from the US here in Cancun. The deal back in Bali agreed by the previous US President, George W. Bush, was that the US would cut its emissions and provide finance and technology. In fact, that’s pretty much the deal agreed to almost two decades ago by his father!

The world expects even more from President Obama, who only a year ago was
awarded a Nobel Peace Prize for his potential to contribute to multilateral
cooperation, including cooperation on climate.

No one wants to give another lump of coal to the country we all need for a truly global climate solution. So let’s make this the last one we ever give to the US and use it to fire up their delegation to put the 'Yes We Can' into Cancun!"

"Papua New Guinea earns the 2nd place Fossil. In their desperation to get a REDD agreement at all costs, Parties have been pushing for weaker and weaker text almost on a daily basis. The implementation of the social, environmental and governance safeguards is just about at rock bottom. Some countries want no mechanism that would guarantee compliance, and instead proposed a weak system to 'monitor and inform' how the safeguards are addressed, but for PNG, even that was too strong!

PNG has now proposed to weaken the text even further to simply establish a process to only share information - with no actual obligation to do so. And we all know how poor PNG is at sharing information. We must ask - share with who? Themselves perhaps! We hope our friends in PNG will share with the world what's going on behind the scenes in their country especially with carbon cowboys riding into town stealing local peoples land and rights. So for that clanger, a fossil to PNG."

“The 1st place Fossil goes to Canada. In a briefing with journalists this morning, Canada’s environment minister dismissed the principle of historical responsibility as a ‘sidecar’ issue.

That’s a pretty convenient stance for a country in the top tier of cumulative
greenhouse gas emitters. But maybe it’s not surprising that Canada considers
historical responsibility as nothing more than a distracting side issue — after all, this is the same government that decided Kyoto targets were optional.

With that kind of attitude, it’s not surprising that the rest of world has started to consider Canada a ‘sidecar’ country. And Canada’s current government seems to be more concerned about getting oil into the tank than about the safety of the passengers.”

"The Alliance of Small Island States, Small Island Developing States, and Least Developed Countries win the first Ray of the Day in Cancun, and what a bright one it is! Returning the reference to 1.5 degrees C in the Shared Vision text is crucial for shining some light on the line between survival and destruction for some nations. For keeping our attention, and the text, on what matters most, AOSIS, the SIDS, and the LDCs earn a Ray of the Day."
_____________________________________________________________________
About CAN: The Climate Action Network is a worldwide network of roughly 500
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. www.climatenetwork.org

About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate talks in 1999 in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress in the negotiations in the last days of talks. The Ray of the Day, a newer award, honors countries that have done something exceptional to move the negotiations forward.

Related Member Organization: 

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