Tag: UNFCCC

CAN Intervention - High Level Segment - COP 12 - Nov 2007

As we enter the final hours of negotiations here in Nairobi, the Climate Action Network calls for bold leadership in keeping with the scale and urgency of the challenge before us. Climate change is the greatest threat to human security we have ever faced. But we negotiate here and act at home as if we are committed to climate change, rather than to avoiding it. The recent release of the Stern Report on the Economics of climate change is the latest call to action.

Thank you Mr. President and distinguished delegates.

My name is Louise Comeau. I have the honour today of addressing you on behalf of the members of the Climate Action Network.

As we enter the final hours of negotiations here in Nairobi, the Climate Action Network calls for bold leadership in keeping with the scale and urgency of the challenge before us.

Climate change is the greatest threat to human security we have ever faced. But we negotiate here and act at home as if we are committed to climate change, rather than to avoiding it.

The recent release of the Stern Report on the Economics of climate change is the latest call to action.

The day is fast approaching when we no longer have the option of avoiding 2 degrees average global warming. At this level of warming – and noting – that global average temperature increases of this level would mean up to six degrees warming in Canada – we start to cross critical thresholds for water, food, and environmental systems.

Business as usual will mean even greater warming and risk up to 20 percent of the value of the global economy.

We have known for almost two decades that radical reductions are needed to avoid economically, socially and environmentally destructive climate change.

We have also known that taking action will cost far less than the cost of the impacts with the figure of 1 percent of global GDP consistent with many assessments, including in Canada where I come from.

Further delay is simply not responsible.

The world is watching: the welfare of your citizens, your communities, and your economies is in your hands.

Nairobi must set the stage for the launch of formal negotiations at COP/MOP3 if we are to avoid a gap between commitment periods.

Courage, creativity and flexibility will be needed to finalize such a Nairobi package and there is reason to be hopeful.

We welcome the positive gestures shown in recent days by a number of developed and developing countries offering concrete proposals for moving forward.

Sadly, however, others among you have been less respectful; less forthcoming about your intentions. It will take courage to confront the obstacles placed before us by these laggards.

There is only one atmosphere. Failure to meet current targets and to set deep targets for the second commitment period risks all our security.

And no country can be allowed to escape its responsibility to contribute its fair share. We owe it to current and future generations. Please - mind the gap - for all our sakes.

 

Thank you.
 

Public Participation in the CDM: Report from COP7 - March 2002

 

COP7 finalized the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) rules, but left many important public participation elements open to further elaboration by the Parties and the CDM Executive Board (EB).  While some important public participation provisions were strengthened at COP7, stakeholders’  access to information and opportunities to comment on CDM projects remain limited in both frequency and scope.  The list below 
highlights areas in which the CDM rules must be strengthened to ensure adequate public participation.  A summary chart follows and provides an inventory of all public participation-related provisions in the CDM.
Organization: 
Related Member Organization: 

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