Tag: UNFCCC

CAN Submission: Cancun Building Blocks, October 2010

THE POST-COPENHAGEN ROAD

A fair, ambitious and binding deal is needed more urgently than ever. Climate science is more compelling by the day. Impacts are coming harder and faster. Disastrous flooding in Pakistan, heat waves and forest fires in Russia and hottest recorded temperatures around the globe, amongst other devastating climate-related events, all point to the need for urgent action. Levels of warming once thought to be safe, may well not be, 1.5˚C is the new 2˚C. 

Negotiations Post-Copenhagen
Copenhagen was a watershed moment for public interest and support for climate action – and people have not lost interest. More people in more countries than ever have put their governments on notice that they expect a fair,
ambitious and binding global deal to be agreed urgently. Trust-building is essential after the disappointment of Copenhagen. Developed country leadership must be at the core of trust building efforts. Countries must show
their commitment to the UNFCCC process by driving it forward with political will and flexible positions, rather than endless rounds of repetitive negotiations. Many countries are troublingly pessimistic for Cancun, and are working to lower expectations. While others, including countries most vulnerable to climate change, maintain high expectations.

Challenges ahead of Cancun
There are many challenges to getting a full fair, ambitious and binding deal at Cancun, including:

  • Lack of a shared vision for the ultimate objective of the agreement, and the equitable allocation of the remaining carbon budget and emissions reduction/limitation commitments;
  • Sharp divisions on the legal form of an eventual outcome;
  • Failure of the US Senate to pass comprehensive legislation this year; and
  • Current economic difficulties facing many countries, which make it difficult to mobilize the substantial commitments to long-term climate finance needed as part of any ambitious agreement. 

Positive moves afoot
However, more and more countries, both developing and developed, are stepping up their efforts to pursue low-carbon development and adaptation, despite the absence of an international agreement. This can be seen in a variety of ways:

  • Investments in renewable energies have continued their exponential growth, increasing to 19% of global energy consumed;
  • Progressive countries are working to move the negotiations forward;
  • There is a growing perception that low-carbon and climate-resilient development is the only option to sustainably ensure the right to development and progress in poverty reduction. 

So, what does a pathway forward look like?

Firstly we must learn the lessons of Copenhagen. The “nothing’s agreed until everything’s agreed” dynamic from Copenhagen could mean that nothing would be agreed in Cancun. An agreement in Cancun should instead be a balanced and significant step toward reaching a full fair, ambitious & binding deal at COP 17 in South Africa. This will require parties to work together in good faith to create sufficient gains at Cancun, and a clear roadmap to South Africa. This paper outlines how that could be achieved. 

CAN Intervention: Talanoa Technical Phase Wrap Up Statement, December 6

The IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5oC  is the most important contribution to the Talanoa Dialogue - it is a game-changer and clearly lays out “where we are”, “where we need to go” and “how we can get there”. 2°C of warming is much more dangerous than we thoughts a few years ago. We only have 12 years left to act swiftly and revert the current trend.  

Organization: 

CAN Intervention: COP 24 Closing Statement, December 15

The IPCC 1.5C Report is clear: we have just 12 years to make radical emission cuts if we are to avert a climate catastrophe.

Here in Katowice, governments were expected to craft robust rules for the Paris Agreement that would build confidence and drive climate action, to deliver adequate and predictable finance, and to commit to enhancing their climate targets by 2020.

 

Organization: 

Civil Society representatives denied entry to Poland to participate in climate talks

Katowice, 7 December 2018: It is with deep concern that Climate Action Network (CAN) and its partners have learnt that Polish authorities denied entry and/or deported at least 12 members of civil society groups due to attend the United Nations climate talks in Poland.

The deportations follow the enactment of national legislation earlier this year passed by the Polish Government in relation to the 24th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC CoP24) currently underway in the southern city of Katowice, from 2 - 14 December 2018. Several United Nations human rights experts have publicly questioned the compatibility of the law with international human rights standards.

“The fact that these are not isolated instances are extremely worrying and we view the actions by the Polish border authorities in an extremely serious light,” said Dr. Stephan Singer, Interim Executive Focal Point at Climate Action Network (CAN). CAN is a network comprising of more than 1,300 organisations working in over 120 countries. Under its network CAN convenes the largest share of environmental non-governmental organisations under the UN climate convention.

“The full and effective participation by civil society is entrenched in the Convention and, in fact, is imperative in our efforts to urgently transition to a new climate regime.”

Several civil society organisations have registered strong objection to the incidents that occured since the beginning of the UN conference.

"We strongly condemn the denial of entry and deportation of colleagues who have not been allowed into Poland in order to take part in COP24. From what we understand the reasons for refusing entry are due to allegations that they are a ‘threat to national security.’ These staff members and volunteers are individuals committed to tackling the climate crisis the world faces through campaigning for sustainable solutions,” said May Boeve, Executive Director of 350.org.

“It is the belief of all of us at 350.org, and our partners, that the biggest threat that we face to our international and national security is that of not tackling the climate crisis and taking the urgent and necessary action to leave fossil fuels in the ground now.  This is underscored in the recent IPCC Special Report on 1.5C Global Warming.

The voices of those denied entry to COP24 are essential to the unfolding climate talks and it is unacceptable that their presence at the climate talks should be impeded in this way. Ongoing restrictions on civil society will not stop a resilient climate movement"

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The statement is supported by

350.org

Greenpeace

CAN Europe

CAN EECCA

Protect the Planet

Demand Climate Justice

SustainUS

Thanks Grassroots

Global Justice Alliance

Union of Concerned Scientists

The Indigenous Environmental Network

Climate Justice Alliance

Attac

The Just Transition Alliance

Oil Change International

11.11.11
Ukrainian Climate Network

Carre Geo & Environnement

Green Network

INFORSE

 

Reactions From CAN Members

 

Greenpeace Poland Office Director Bohdan Pękacki said:

“As host of the most important climate summit since Paris, Poland has the eyes of the world on it and the question is, what sort of host does Poland want to be? Will it embrace the demands of people demanding action and allow their voices to be heard or silence them through denied entry?”

 

Friends of the Earth Germany’s Ann-Kathrin Schneider said:

“We are working together with civil society groups from all over the world in Katowice to hold our leaders accountable and demand a response to the climate crisis. We are extremely worried about the decision of Polish authorities to deny individuals from our partner group entry into the country. We demand that everybody who wants to come to the climate conference is allowed into the country to enact their right to participate in peaceful civil society actions for the climate.”

 

Iryna Stavchuk, Executive Director of the Centre for Environmental Initiatives “Ecoaction” (Ukraine) said:

“Participation of representatives of civil society organisations in climate negotiations is crucial, as they act as important leverage in decision-making. All this is to make sure that achievement of Paris Agreement goal to keep global warming at 1,5 - 2 °С level becomes a reality. We find the actions of Polish authorities denying entry of peaceful activists unacceptable”.

 

Wendel Trio, Director Climate Action Network Europe said:

“It is appalling and a disgrace that one of our collaborators who successfully co-organised a March of 65.000 people in Brussels last week has been denied entry into Poland. People are demanding climate action from our governments and should be supported for doing so. The Polish government is afraid to see the reality that also they need to act.”

 

About Climate Action Network: Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 1200 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. www.climatenetwork.org .

For more information, contact:

François Rogers

Head of Communications

CAN International

Mail: frogers@climatenetwork.org, or whatsapp/call on +44 (0) 7 585 707 220

 

Kim Bryan

Global Communications Campaigner

350.org

Mail: kim.bryan@350.org, or whatsapp/call on +447770881503

Organization: 

CAN Intervention: Joint COP, CMP, CMA, SBSTA, SBI and APA Opening Statement, December 2

At COP24, Parties must realize this vision and spur the Paris Agreement to action by:

- Committing to strengthening their NDCs by 2020 to be compatible with a 1.5C emissions reduction pathway

- Delivering on climate finance and other support need to achieve emission reductions in line with 1.5C; and

- Agreeing on a rulebook that will ensure the environmental integrity of the Paris Agreement

Organization: 

CAN Annual Policy Document, Executive Summary, Spanish: Katowice - Impulsando el Acuerdo de París a la Acción, November 2018

El informe del IPCC sobre 1.5ºC es una alarma de alerta a la humanidad sobre la urgencia de la crisis climática. El reporte refleja que incluso medio grado de calentamiento hace una gran diferencia en términos de impactos, más de lo que se conocía antes. También refleja que algunas comunidades y ecosistemas ya están siendo forzados a superar los límites de la adaptación. El informe muestra además que las herramientas necesarias para alcanzar las metas del Acuerdo de París de limitar el calentamiento global a 1.5ºC están dentro del alcance de la ciencia y de la capacidad humana. Es económica y técnicamente factible, pero necesitamos voluntad política ahora mismo. 

Organization: 

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