Tag: CAN Positions

CAN Position: Solar Radiation Modification (SRM), September 2019

1. Robust adaptation and mitigation actions are the first-line solutions to climate change. SRM is not a substitute for either and should not be seen as climate action.

2. Recognize the inherent transboundary nature of SRM and significant and unknown risks (geopolitical, social, environmental, ethical) involved.

3. Strongly opposes deployment of SRM. 4. Strongly opposes real-world experiments

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CAN Position: Climate and Biodiversity, June 2019

 

Two crises pose serious threats to life on Earth: the climate change crisis and the biodiversity crisis. Major global intergovernmental assessments, including from the IPCC and the IPBES, have demonstrated that they are strongly interlinked. This calls for Parties to move beyond treating these separately towards integrated approaches. Both the IPCC and IPBES reports, along with an increasing body of literature, highlight and stress the importance of intact resilient ecosystems in meeting the goals of the Paris Agreement. Indeed, nature-based solutions, with appropriate safeguards, can provide 37% of the solution to meeting the 1.5 C target by 2030 (IPBES 2019).

However, much needs to be done for this to be recognised in international action, including under the UNFCCC, CBD and SDG post-2020 agendas. This position statement sets out the scope of the crises, the potential for perverse outcomes, the opportunities in the current agreements and the steps governments need to take to jointly approach the biodiversity and climate crisis. Very often, carbon-rich high integrity ecosystems, such as forests, grasslands, peatlands, mangroves and other wetlands, are under significant pressure. The consequent reduction in carbon stocks and sequestration potential, as a result of land-use change and degraded ecosystems, contributes significantly to the climate and biodiversity crises.

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CAN Position: Energy Ambition in NDCs, June 2019

 

The world has no time to waste to fully implement the Paris Agreement. Current Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) unacceptably will lead to above 3°C of warming – a death sentence for many communities, species and our ecosystems.1 To respond to the climate emergency in 2019 and in accordance with Articles 2 and 4 of the Paris Agreement, Parties must enhance the ambition of NDCs to put the world on track to limit global warming to 1.5°C.

Fossil fuels were responsible for about three quarters of all GHG emissions in 2018 and power the bulk of final energy demand, while modern renewable energy constitutes a mere 11%. A key way to raise NDC ambition is to commit to the rapid energy transformation required to cut global emissions by 50% by 2030 and reach net-zero emissions by 2050, in line with the recent IPCC 1.5°C Special Report.2 A transformational change in the production and consumption patterns of energy, including increasing energy efficiency and lowering unsustainable demand by rich countries, is pivotal to evade an ecological breakdown.3 A rapid and just energy transition hinges on unprecedented political will – to equitably shift each country’s economy from fossil fuels to renewable energy.

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Briefing on Implementation Guidelines for Article 6 of the Paris Agreement, June 2019

At COP24 in Katowice, Poland, countries were unable to include guidance on Article 6 into the Paris Rulebook--except for paragraph 77(d) which stipulates how “a Party participating in cooperative approaches that involve the use of internationally transferred mitigation outcomes (ITMOs) towards its NDC under Article 4, or authorizes the use of mitigation outcomes for international purposes other than achievement of its NDC” report on such use in the structured summary of the Paris Agreement’s transparency framework. Countries will work to finalize guidance on Article 6 with a view to delivering decision text by the end of COP25. As Article 6 is one of the last pieces of the Paris Rulebook to be completed, increased high-level engagement from Ministers is possible and they require better understanding of the political issues related to Article 6 and the technical ones that still need work in advance of Katowice. This briefing provides a topline summary of CAN-I’s positions on Article 6 and explains key outstanding technical issues.

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CAN Briefing: UNFCCC SB50, May 2019

In 2019 we only have 11 years left to avoid the worst effects of the climate crisis as warned by the IPCC Special Report on 1.5°C. Outside of the negotiations, people are declaring a state of emergency for their futures. To not fail the people who refuse to accept excuses for inaction, negotiations at SB50 must deliver significant progress and serve as a moment to build momentum to enable greater ambition in 2019.

At COP24, parties agreed largely on common guidelines for the Paris Agreement and a COP decision which clearly highlights the need to initiate national processes to enhance NDCs by 2020. However, COP24 fell significantly short in political will to tackle the emergency of the climate crisis and make concrete commitments to enhance NDCs: The IPCC’s Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C makes clear we need to act now to cut emissions in half by 2030.

In 2019 countries need to significantly advance progress and deliver a package of ambitious deliveries in three key areas: Enhancing mitigation ambition, providing and scaling up support, and addressing climate impacts.

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CAN Briefing: 2019 SDG-Review: The Natural Link between Climate Action and Sustainable Development, May 2019

The IPCC Special Report on 1.5°C is the first to explore the synergies and tradeoffs for climate mitigation and adaptation actions with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In the report, climate change impacts and responses are closely linked to sustainable development which balances social well-being, economic prosperity and environmental protection. The SDGs, the report notes, ‘provide an established framework for assessing the links between limiting global warming of 1.5°C or 2°C and development goals that include poverty eradication, reducing inequalities, and climate action’.

 

 

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Climate Action Network Submission: Elements to be included in Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture (KJWA) May, 2019

At COP23, Decision –CP/23 invited parties and observers to submit their views on the joint SBSTA-SBI work known as the “Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture” (KJWA), to inform workshops to be held atSB50 on the topics of:  2(b) Methods and approaches for assessing adaptation, adaptation co-benefits and resilience) and 2(c) Improved soil carbon, soil health and soil fertility under grassland and cropland as well as integrated systems, including water management.

Part One of this submission outlines recommendations for “Modalities and Procedures” with the purpose of shaping the KJWA mode of working to be effective, rigorous and relevant; Part Two responds specifically to 2b) and 2c) under the heading “Technical Content” with the purpose of sharing CAN members’ knowledge and expertise on technical issues related to agriculture and climate change.

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CAN Briefing: Expectations for the 17th Informal Meeting on Further Actions Against Climate Change

At COP24 Parties agreed largely the foundational elements of the implementation guidelines of the Paris Agreement. In 2019 countries need to complement their work in Katowice by agreeing on strong guidelines for implementing Article 6 of the Paris Agreement, advance on the urgent issue of climate finance including finance to address loss and damage, and by strengthening domestic targets in line with the 1.5°C temperature threshold.

The 17th Informal Meeting on Further Actions Against Climate Change provides the opportunity to advance the discussion on these key issues. Climate Action Network prepared this Briefing outlining expectations for 2019 with the intention of supporting parties at this Meeting.

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CAN Submission: Views and inputs on possible elements to be included in the terms of reference for the review of the Warsaw International Mechanism, February 2019

The IPCC report on 1.5ÅãC is a siren alerting humanity to the urgency of the climate crisis. The report shows that, already, some communities and ecosystems are being forced beyond the limits of adaptation.

Five years after the Warsaw International Mechanism (WIM) for Loss and Damage (L&D) was established at COP19 insufficient attention has been given so far to addressing the support needs of developing countries and raising additional support, including finance, to address L&D under WIM.

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