Tag: CAN Positions

CAN Position: Implications of 1.5C & Zero-Carbon Goal by 2050 on Public Finance Institutions, June 2017

Key Message and Recommendations

Under the Paris Agreement, 196 countries agreed to align financial flows with a pathway towards low-GHG, climate-resilient development. The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the 2030 Agenda aim for universal access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy and infrastructure by 2030. This CAN position paper outlines the role of public finance institutions (PFIs) such as Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs), other Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) and Export Credit Agencies (ECAs) in supporting countries in the zero-carbon, climate-resilient transition. The paper urges that:

  • Public finance must be transformational, catalytic, inclusive and responsive;
  • PFIs must apply precautionary principles in assessing the climate and development impacts of their policies and projects avoiding harm to people, nature and economy;
  • PFIs must provide policy, technical and financial support to help countries transform their energy sectors to sustainable, efficient systems that prioritise energy access;
  • PFIs must cease by 2020 direct, indirect, ancillary infrastructure and policy support for upstream and downstream fossil fuels, GHG-intensive projects, nuclear, large bioenergy and hydropower when more cost-effective and less damaging alternatives exist;All PFI investments must meet strict environmental and social development criteria and be assessed through a pro-poor, inclusive, climate-resilient and gender-responsive lens;
  • All PFIs, beginning with OECD countries in 2017, should report annually on their progress in scaling back support for fossil fuel-related transactions.

This paper identifies a number of opportunities for PFIs:

  • MDB country strategy revision processes provide an opportunity to integrate Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and long-term strategies (LTS) for zero-carbon development under the Paris Agreement;
  • Policy reforms lending can be strategically influential to usher in urgently-required energy and infrastructure sector policy reforms;
  • Strengthening oversight over their financial intermediaries’ compliance with environmental and social frameworks, as well as gender and energy policy provisions would significantly reduce impacts on ecosystems and society by PFIs;
  • The results framework for PFI energy investments could incorporate outcome indicators for alignment with the 1.5°C goal and the 2030 Agenda SDGs;
  • All PFIs should initiate reports to present pathways for their operations to contribute to sustainable energy and development commitments of their stakeholder governments.

CAN calls on all PFIs to produce pathways to 1.5°C and Agenda 2030 for their respective operations by 2020 based on a synthesis of scientific advice and an assessment of social and economic development needs.

Note: This position paper is supported by more detailed analysis in a companion document.

Organization: 
Related Campaign: 
AttachmentSize
PDF icon companion_document_-_pfis_1.5c.pdf211.08 KB

G20 Issue Brief: Long-term Strategies, February 2017

The Paris Agreement calls for countries to formulate long-term low-GHG emission development strategies, in line with pursuing efforts to limiting global temperature increase to 1.5ºC. With the 2016 adoption of Agenda 2030, countries are also beginning to implement policies to fulfil the sustainable development goals (SDGs).

Long-term strategies create a framework within which the implications of short-to-medium-term decisions that impact both greenhouse gas emission trajectories and development pathways can be coherently planned and adjusted where necessary. Developing and implementing these strategies ensures alignment with the long-term goals of the Paris Agreement, in a way that fosters increased prosperity for citizens, reduces the risk of locking-in unsustainable and high-emission infrastructure, and will help to avoid stranded high-carbon assets.

Careful long-term planning also provides an opportunity to maximize socio-economic benefits, such as cleaner air and water, improved security for jobs and energy access, and better health. If well done, these strategies can identify such opportunities, as well as challenges, open a space for democratic consultation on these implications, and secure a just transition for workers and communities which depend today on a fossil-based economy. 

Region: 
Organization: 

CAN Submission: Cancun Building Blocks, October 2010

THE POST-COPENHAGEN ROAD

A fair, ambitious and binding deal is needed more urgently than ever. Climate science is more compelling by the day. Impacts are coming harder and faster. Disastrous flooding in Pakistan, heat waves and forest fires in Russia and hottest recorded temperatures around the globe, amongst other devastating climate-related events, all point to the need for urgent action. Levels of warming once thought to be safe, may well not be, 1.5˚C is the new 2˚C. 

Negotiations Post-Copenhagen
Copenhagen was a watershed moment for public interest and support for climate action – and people have not lost interest. More people in more countries than ever have put their governments on notice that they expect a fair,
ambitious and binding global deal to be agreed urgently. Trust-building is essential after the disappointment of Copenhagen. Developed country leadership must be at the core of trust building efforts. Countries must show
their commitment to the UNFCCC process by driving it forward with political will and flexible positions, rather than endless rounds of repetitive negotiations. Many countries are troublingly pessimistic for Cancun, and are working to lower expectations. While others, including countries most vulnerable to climate change, maintain high expectations.

Challenges ahead of Cancun
There are many challenges to getting a full fair, ambitious and binding deal at Cancun, including:

  • Lack of a shared vision for the ultimate objective of the agreement, and the equitable allocation of the remaining carbon budget and emissions reduction/limitation commitments;
  • Sharp divisions on the legal form of an eventual outcome;
  • Failure of the US Senate to pass comprehensive legislation this year; and
  • Current economic difficulties facing many countries, which make it difficult to mobilize the substantial commitments to long-term climate finance needed as part of any ambitious agreement. 

Positive moves afoot
However, more and more countries, both developing and developed, are stepping up their efforts to pursue low-carbon development and adaptation, despite the absence of an international agreement. This can be seen in a variety of ways:

  • Investments in renewable energies have continued their exponential growth, increasing to 19% of global energy consumed;
  • Progressive countries are working to move the negotiations forward;
  • There is a growing perception that low-carbon and climate-resilient development is the only option to sustainably ensure the right to development and progress in poverty reduction. 

So, what does a pathway forward look like?

Firstly we must learn the lessons of Copenhagen. The “nothing’s agreed until everything’s agreed” dynamic from Copenhagen could mean that nothing would be agreed in Cancun. An agreement in Cancun should instead be a balanced and significant step toward reaching a full fair, ambitious & binding deal at COP 17 in South Africa. This will require parties to work together in good faith to create sufficient gains at Cancun, and a clear roadmap to South Africa. This paper outlines how that could be achieved. 

Climate Action Network Submission: Elements to be included in Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture (KJWA) May, 2019

At COP23, Decision –CP/23 invited parties and observers to submit their views on the joint SBSTA-SBI work known as the “Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture” (KJWA), to inform workshops to be held atSB50 on the topics of:  2(b) Methods and approaches for assessing adaptation, adaptation co-benefits and resilience) and 2(c) Improved soil carbon, soil health and soil fertility under grassland and cropland as well as integrated systems, including water management.

Part One of this submission outlines recommendations for “Modalities and Procedures” with the purpose of shaping the KJWA mode of working to be effective, rigorous and relevant; Part Two responds specifically to 2b) and 2c) under the heading “Technical Content” with the purpose of sharing CAN members’ knowledge and expertise on technical issues related to agriculture and climate change.

Topics: 
Organization: 

CAN Briefing: Expectations for the 17th Informal Meeting on Further Actions Against Climate Change

At COP24 Parties agreed largely the foundational elements of the implementation guidelines of the Paris Agreement. In 2019 countries need to complement their work in Katowice by agreeing on strong guidelines for implementing Article 6 of the Paris Agreement, advance on the urgent issue of climate finance including finance to address loss and damage, and by strengthening domestic targets in line with the 1.5°C temperature threshold.

The 17th Informal Meeting on Further Actions Against Climate Change provides the opportunity to advance the discussion on these key issues. Climate Action Network prepared this Briefing outlining expectations for 2019 with the intention of supporting parties at this Meeting.

Organization: 

CAN Submission: Views and inputs on possible elements to be included in the terms of reference for the review of the Warsaw International Mechanism, February 2019

The IPCC report on 1.5ÅãC is a siren alerting humanity to the urgency of the climate crisis. The report shows that, already, some communities and ecosystems are being forced beyond the limits of adaptation.

Five years after the Warsaw International Mechanism (WIM) for Loss and Damage (L&D) was established at COP19 insufficient attention has been given so far to addressing the support needs of developing countries and raising additional support, including finance, to address L&D under WIM.

Organization: 

CAN Annual Policy Document, Executive Summary, Spanish: Katowice - Impulsando el Acuerdo de París a la Acción, November 2018

El informe del IPCC sobre 1.5ºC es una alarma de alerta a la humanidad sobre la urgencia de la crisis climática. El reporte refleja que incluso medio grado de calentamiento hace una gran diferencia en términos de impactos, más de lo que se conocía antes. También refleja que algunas comunidades y ecosistemas ya están siendo forzados a superar los límites de la adaptación. El informe muestra además que las herramientas necesarias para alcanzar las metas del Acuerdo de París de limitar el calentamiento global a 1.5ºC están dentro del alcance de la ciencia y de la capacidad humana. Es económica y técnicamente factible, pero necesitamos voluntad política ahora mismo. 

Organization: 

CAN Annual Policy Document, Executive Summary, French: Katowice - Transformer l’Accord de Paris en Action, November 2018

Le rapport du GIEC sur l’objectif de 1.5 ° C apparait comme une sirène alertant l’humanité sur l’urgence de la crise climatique. Le rapport montre que même un demi-degré de réchauffement aurait une énorme différence en termes d’impacts; bien au-délà de ce que qui était anticipé jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Ce rapport met aussi en évidence que certaines communautés et certains écosystèmes ont déjà atteint les limites de leurs capacités d›adaptation. Il démontre également que l’humanité dispose des ressources techniques et humaines nécessaires pour atteindre l’objectif fixé par l’accord de Paris de limiter le réchauffement de la planète à 1,5 ° C. Il s’agit d’un défi économiquement viable et techniquement réalisable, mais pour y arriver l’humanité a besoin d’une volonté politique réelle. 

Organization: 

CAN Annual Policy Document, Executive Summary, Arabic: Katowice - Spurring the Paris Agreement to Action, November 2018

تقرير الهيئة الحكومية المعنية بتغير المناخ الـ IPCCحول 1.5 درجة مئوية هو صافرة إنذار لتنبيه الإنسانية إلى الحاجة الملحة حول أزمة المناخ. ويبين التقرير أنه ومع نصف درجة مئوية من الحرارة، يمكنه ان يحدث فرقا كبيرا من حيث الآثار وأكثر بكثير مما كان معروفا في السابق.

لكنه يظهر أيضا أن بعض المجتمعات والنظم الإيكولوجية فعليا، يتم إجبارها على حدود التكيف.

يوضح التقرير أيضا الأدوات اللازمة لتحقيق أهداف اتفاقية باريس للحد من ارتفاع درجات الحرارة الى 1.5 درجة مئوية.  والتي تعد ممكنة اقتصاديا وتقنيا، ولكن ينقصها الإرادة السياسية في الوقت الحالي.

Organization: 

CAN Annual Policy Document, Executive Summary, Russian Translation: Katowice - Spurring the Paris Agreement to Action, November 2018

Специальный доклад МГЭИК по цели 1,5°C прозвучал тревожным сигналом, предупреждающим человечество о необходимости в срочном порядке принять меры для урегулирования климатического кризиса. Согласно докладу, потепление даже на половину градуса имеет огромное значение с точки зрения воздействий, это – больше, чем было известно ранее. Доклад также свидетельствует о том, что для некоторых сообществ и экосистем ситуация выходит за пределы возможности адаптации. Кроме того, в докладе продемонстрировано, что инструменты, необходимые для достижения цели Парижского соглашения по ограничению роста температуры на планете до 1,5°C, относятся к сфере науки и человеческому потенциалу. Это осуществимо с экономической и технической точки зрения, но нам понадобится политическая воля уже сегодня.

Organization: 

Pages

Subscribe to Tag: CAN Positions